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Thread: 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO scratch build

  1. #11
    Junior Member
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    Fantastic skills there, great work

  2. #12
    Senior Member C5GTO's Avatar
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    There was a report of missing pictures in this thread. I'm told the issue has now been fixed. Please speak up if you are not able to see the pictures.
    Joel Heinke
    (Classic Roadsters Cobra, Ferrari 250GTO under construction)

  3. #13
    Senior Member Don's Avatar
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    I can only see the first post pictures but none of the others in your thread any more. I was able to see everything previously.

    Cheers
    Don
    308 Ferrari replica
    Prova Countach 5000QV

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don View Post
    I can only see the first post pictures but none of the others in your thread any more. I was able to see everything previously.

    Cheers
    Don
    Same issue here.

  5. #15
    Senior Member RCR's Avatar
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    Weird, I've got them all. Make sure you're checked in.

    Bob
    Bob custom '84 Fiero SE --->>> custom F408
    http://www.madmechanics.com/forum/cu...ilepic37_1.gif

  6. #16
    Senior Member 275NART's Avatar
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    Did you widen the body or the arches from the original in order to account for the widened track? I'm curious to see what difference 6" makes to the look of the car and the metal work. Keep at it!

  7. #17
    Senior Member C5GTO's Avatar
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    Question Are pics still missing?

    Ok, took a second try at fixing the photos. Are they all visible now??
    Joel Heinke
    (Classic Roadsters Cobra, Ferrari 250GTO under construction)

  8. #18
    Senior Member C5GTO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 275NART View Post
    Did you widen the body or the arches from the original in order to account for the widened track? I'm curious to see what difference 6" makes to the look of the car and the metal work. Keep at it!
    Great question. The 6" is spread across both the body and the arches/fenders. A little bit here and little bit there. If the extra was put in a single place then it would be more obvious.
    Joel Heinke
    (Classic Roadsters Cobra, Ferrari 250GTO under construction)

  9. #19
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    I'm getting all the pics now, thank you. Fantastic work man. Your quality makes me wanna do better at my own work. Cheers Jose'

  10. #20
    Senior Member C5GTO's Avatar
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    Body buck - Phase 1

    I started with (and continue to hold) 3 main priorities for the C5 GTO project:
    1. Original ’62 style GTO looks. Not identical but an uncompromised likeness.
    2. “Super Car” performance
    3. Comfortable and reliable enough to drive regularly


    Given these priorities, I then started searching for options to purchase a body. The most popular was re-body kits for Datsun 240/260Z cars. While the kits available did a decent job of capturing the GTO look, there were obvious compromises like shorter wheelbase and associated shorter nose length, high cowl, less curved windshield, and hatchback instead of separate rear window and trunk opening. As to my 2nd priority, it would take very significant re-working of the whole chassis and a V8 transplant to come close to super car performance. So long story short, I ruled out this option.

    I did find a couple of sources that claimed to be able to provide “complete” GTO bodies. The source in Italy for an aluminum body was probably legit but it wasn’t practical to try to pull off a trans-oceanic deal like that. The source in the US was outrageously expensive and never was able to convince me that they would deliver the goods once they took a down payment. There’s way too many horror stories in the replica space like this so I’m extremely cautious in this regard.

    So I decided to roll up my sleeves and give body building a go. Body material, aluminum or fiberglass then became a critical path decision. In hindsight, I’d make a different choice today, but I did choose to go down the fiberglass path then. I don’t regret that choice, I’d just make a different choice today because I’ve come to really, really enjoy metal shaping. You’ll see more on this later.

    The next choice was to either build from scratch or take something existing and transform it. I chose to use a Z car GTO body kit and transform it. While only the very front part of the nose was mostly retained in the transformation, I’d still make that same choice again because it gave me a foundation to build upon. Body building is very visual and having something, even if not quite right to work from, is better than nothing.

    A friend introduced me to Tom McBurnie, owner, car designer, and builder at Thunder Ranch. I believe Tom is retired now, but I'll give him a shout out, Thank You, here for his contribution to this project. I’d describe Tom’s personality as, “colorful character”, but he knew a bunch of tricks for designing and building car bodies that I found extremely valuable in practice. The key advice that has carried true for this project was:
    • Find an existing OEM windshield and build the body to fit it
    • Select engine, drivetrain, suspension, and wheel/tire size first and make sure they will all fit within the “envelope” of the body shape prior to building the body
    • Spread differences in body dimensions (between original and replica) over large spaces otherwise they will stick out and be obvious


    I struck a deal with Tom to buy a GTO kit from him along with 3 days of shop time from his crew and him to start the transformation process. Prior to the visit to Thunder Ranch, I had completed the chassis build to fit within the GTO body envelope and had built plywood templates for the roof line. The middle template was made from a cardboard template I’d taken directly from #3943GT so I knew the “skyline” profile is correct. Between these templates and the chassis, it gave us fixed positions for windshield, door openings, wheel openings, etc.









    The GTO windshield is very curved as compared to modern day car glass, so I had to find something from the 1950/60s era. Given the C5 GTO is 6” wider than the original, using an original windshield (even if one could be located) was not an option. I settled on using a 1960 Chevy Impala windshield, even though it would involve cutting on 3 sides, because it gave me the extra width and curved shape.

    Another of Tom’s tricks was to make a fiberglass copy of the windshield using the inside of the glass for a mold. Apply mold release to the glass, lay up about 3/16” of fiberglass and brace cross wise with plywood. The fiberglass copy is then used during body building and serves as a perfect template for cutting the windshield glass when you get to that stage. Having a “durable” windshield shape to work with is very important, ask me how I know I don't have any pictures for making the fiberglass windshield copy but I will show pictures later where I used it during buck building and when cutting the windshield glass.

    Oh but I'm getting ahead of the story here. The first step buck building was to hang the newly purchased body panels on the chassis and then slice them up



    The chassis was leveled and the posts on either side of front wheels were set to dead vertical. This gave reference points to ensure the panels could be hung straight.



    These panels were attached to chassis with rectangular tube hose clamped to frame tubes and then fiber-glassed in place. The front fender was sliced vertically down the middle for lengthening.
    Joel Heinke
    (Classic Roadsters Cobra, Ferrari 250GTO under construction)

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