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Thread: 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO scratch build

  1. #21
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    Can't wait to see more !!

  2. #22
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    I am so glad to see this! I was following that series of articles ("Last Chance Garage") but never got to see the final outcome of it. I have always wondered what happened to the car and now I am glad to find it here.

    Excellent work!!!!

  3. #23
    Senior Member C5GTO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mlochala View Post
    I am so glad to see this! I was following that series of articles ("Last Chance Garage") but never got to see the final outcome of it. I have always wondered what happened to the car and now I am glad to find it here.

    Excellent work!!!!
    Thanks mlochala and all the other Last Chance Garage readers out there!! And thanks for the kind words from all my new friends as well

    While I really enjoyed doing Last Chance Garage, I find the forums more enjoyable and useful. Having 2 way interactions is much better than the 1 way nature of published magazines. I learn a lot from other peoples projects and input on the forums so it's a win/win.
    Joel Heinke
    (Classic Roadsters Cobra, Ferrari 250GTO under construction)

  4. #24
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    Body buck phase 1 (cont.)

    The Z car GTO nose was 4” too narrow for the C5 track width. So we made a cut from the corner of the hood opening down between the driving lights and brake fresh air vent opening. Adding 2” on either side resulted in the 4” stretch and also gave the proper spacing between the vent and light on the front of the nose. The masking tape with red paint over it was to give horizontal and vertical reference marks.



    Here’s Tom McBurnie mixing up a witch’s brew of fiberglass resin to glue the now wider nose back together.



    The front fenders/wings needed to be lengthened by 10”. While the Z chassis is about 5” shorter than a GTO, it also has longer doors. The C5 GTO has a 94.5” wheel base and doors sized to match the original GTO so this 10” stretch was needed to cover all those variables.







    The rear of the body needed to be widened, made taller and extended. Sticks were used to hang the corners in space until they could be glued back on. Using a strip of masking tape helps give a visual reference and to confirm we’re getting the right look prior to fixing the corners in place. Masking tape stretched across air is a body builder's friend :-)





    Joel Heinke
    (Classic Roadsters Cobra, Ferrari 250GTO under construction)

  5. #25
    Senior Member C5GTO's Avatar
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    Body buck phase 1 (cont.)

    The forward section of the roof came next. There was no fiberglass panels to start from, so 1/8” door skin plywood was screwed in place horizontally between the other plywood templates and bondo was poured into place about 1 ½” thick. A hot melt glue gun was very useful during the prep to plug the holes/gaps so the bondo wouldn’t seep out.




    Well the 3 days went very fast. Instead of the bare roll bar look I arrived with, the car is starting to resemble a GTO, still very rough with some wide open spaces but definitely starting to take on a GTO look.

    Joel Heinke
    (Classic Roadsters Cobra, Ferrari 250GTO under construction)

  6. #26
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    Really enjoying this. Great skills

  7. #27
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    Body buck - Phase 2

    I describe this as “Phase 2” because it involves building the visible surfaces for the body buck and it occurs in my garage with the work being done exclusively by myself. That is, a first timer at building a body buck. Hopefully, I can pass along some of the key lessons learned.

    What I had from the conclusion of phase 1 was a foundation to build on that had:
    1. the desired placement of all four body corners (corners not being a very good description as these are rounded shapes on this car but the best word that came to mind)
    2. a nose with correctly sized and placed openings
    3. top roof section at proper height and profile.


    Beyond that, I had some very rough shapes and lots of open spaces/gaps.

    First item up in phase 2 was to make sure I had a completely level surface for the entire car so that vertical measurements could be taken from anywhere. I was told most garage floors are not level and mine turned out to match that description. It had a 2.5” slope running diagonally across the length of the car. So I built a plywood covered platform about a foot longer and wider than the car and dialed it in to be absolutely level across the whole surface. Next I strung a length of piano wire down the middle for length of the platform, 1” above the surface and pulled it tight. I could use this center line for accurate horizontal measurements on both sides of the car.

    Next I needed to set the ride height and wheel opening placement around the tires. For this, I needed to purchase wheels and tires I intended to use on the car. I really wanted to use spoke wheels but decided that wasn’t practical given my ambitions for “super car” performance from the C5 GTO. So I opted to use 3 piece forged rims with spoke like centers. For the proper look, I wanted to have tire outside diameters that matched the original GTO but also use modern, high performance tires. The GTO originally used 16” rims and after juggling around the options, I settled on 19” x 10.5” for rear rims and 19” x 9.5” for the front. This way I was able to use modern, low profile tires and still get the same tire height.



    The Z car GTO wheel openings were too small and I had to cut out a section just to mount the tires. From an original GTO wheel opening template, I scribed a line on the fender for the new wheel opening.



    Once this was cut out, I then made an 1/8” plywood template for the shape at the back of the wheel opening and hot melt glued it on.



    I had decided to use the “surfboard method” for shaping the body buck. Specifically, use rigid urethane foam to achieve shape and then coat directly with fiberglass. Urethane foam is soft enough that is easily and quickly shapes out with 40 grit sandpaper on a flat board. I purchased the urethane foam in 4’ x 8’ sheets in 1”, 2” and 3” thicknesses at the local Home Depot store. While better quality foam is available, using this low cost construction variety was fine for the patch work coverage I had to do. I attached it with hot melt glue which worked great as it held the pieces secure and sets quickly.



    It's sanded to shape and dust vacuumed away. As you can imagine, a lot of fine dust is created so be sure to where a mask to protect your lungs.



    Fiberglass resin, matte, and cloth are applied directly over the foam. Unlike other foam materials, urethane foam doesn't lose it's shape or melt away when polyester resin is applied.

    More to come...
    Joel Heinke
    (Classic Roadsters Cobra, Ferrari 250GTO under construction)

  8. #28
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    Post Body buck - Phase 2 (cont.)

    For the rear of the buck, the top and bottom corners on both sides were already in place. What was needed now was to fill-in all the empty space in between.



    The oval in the middle is a flat surface so I made that by laying up fiberglass over 1/8” plywood on the top of my workbench. Then that flat oval piece along with the Z car GTO rear spoiler cut into 2 sections (and some gap filler) and lower roll pan were all fiberglassed together to form the rear Kamm back.



    The edges on the sides were built up with chunks of foam and then fiberglassed. The lower roll pan required quite a bit of bondo to smooth it out after being stretched by several inches.

    If you recall, I chose to make the C5 GTO body wider than the original by about 6” in order to keep the C5 Corvette track width. I chose to put this extra width in different places between the front and back because of how much of the body you can see in the side view varies. In the side view of the front, you can see the tops of both fenders and thus get a feel for the body width. In the rear side view, you can only see the fender in front of you and part of the roof/top given the “fastback” body style. Given, this I decided to make the rear fenders the same width as original and put all the extra width in the roof/top. That way the extra width is obscured in a large surface that is really never in someone’s direct vision. The other advantage to this is extra width in the interior for better seating arrangement and more comfortable driving position (more on this later).





    Plywood templates for the wider roof section were added as guides. 1/8” plywood served as filler between the templates and to form a base for gluing foam to.



    Foam blocks are cut with a long razor knife and hot melt glued in place.



    Shaping is done with a flat board, 40 grit paper to start, and 100 grit for final touches. Sanding was done on crisscrossing diagonals to keep undulations to a minimum.



    I used a multi-layered glass cloth during fiberglassing. It has a couple layers of matte sewn together with a crows weave cloth. I found using this multi-layered cloth saved time, gave a quick build up, and resulted in plenty of strength for the buck surface.
    Joel Heinke
    (Classic Roadsters Cobra, Ferrari 250GTO under construction)

  9. #29
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    Outstanding!.........build....skills....choice of vehicle...job of posting the steps involved...simply outstanding!

    Why can't we get people like this in charge...you know...who even if they are undertaking a new endeavor...do their research...put in the time...make good choices and end up with something everybody can live with and strive to be like?

    Ok, don't want to sidetrack this thread, just wanted to voice my appreciation for your talents/efforts and sharing of your experience.

    Fantastic work.

  10. #30
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    Superb workmanship, well done!

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