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Thread: Where do you stretch Fieros and MR2s?

  1. #11
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    Sorry, wrong topic. My slowpoke computer switched tabs on me.
    Last edited by ronin; 06-01-2012 at 12:17 PM.

  2. #12
    Senior Member am33r's Avatar
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    Your local Auo body and Machine Shop can do it for you. You know, where they work on hotrods and stuff like that.
    It's cutting and welding (I'm no expert but you can show them what you need done and they can do it for like $2000). I know that on a stripped MR2, cut and Stretch shouldn't take more than a day (8hrs) by a talented machinest. Fiero is easier I heard.

    However, once that is done, you do need to weld some metal here and there to make the contact areas of the body and the fiberglass kit solid and resting properly. Also a windshiled surround. With a good diagram and the right metal peices someone can also weld those in a a day too.

    Lastly, some more welding maybe needed to assign door henges correctly, and metal door frame inside the door kit.
    The doors have intricate parts like Windows, handles, locks, hinges, struts, so leave your door till after your done with the body seeing you don't need to tow your car to a machine shop to do that, and you may take as long as years to deal with that or a day and not deal with any of it x_O

    This whole thing seems complicated to non-welder. However, it's what a welder does and it's not so hard to do for them, nor is it lengthy with all the tools and a suitable garage.
    Last edited by am33r; 06-01-2012 at 07:55 PM.

  3. #13
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    I am a welder and already figured the part about attaching the shell. But I don't have any of the equipment to stabilize the car nor do I have any experience working on the uni bodies. Fortunately, a very close friend of mine works for his dad who owns a shop that does this sort of thing. I am pretty sure I can get this done by calling in a favor.

  4. #14
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    It's a square framed chassis. Unibody or not, cut straight down, insert pre measured square tubing and weld. It pretty much squares itself up if you cut at the same exact place from the other side or not, the square insert is what makes it even.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by onewickedsvt View Post
    It's a square framed chassis. Unibody or not, cut straight down, insert pre measured square tubing and weld. It pretty much squares itself up if you cut at the same exact place from the other side or not, the square insert is what makes it even.
    LOL. I love your logic. You're making me feel more comfortable. But from what I've read, it involves temporarily removing the engine AND having the car mounted. I don't know enough about the inner workings of a car to be playing with the engine and I don't have (or at least I don't think I have) a way to mount it and definitely no way to haul the engine around. But I have a friend who does stuff like this all day every day and I am 90% sure he'll do it for free as a returned favor. I DO want to know the process though, so count on me being there when it happens and assisting in it.

  6. #16
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    It does not REQUIRE removing it. It can be done with it in, but veryy carefully.

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