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Thread: Chassis Weight

  1. #1

    Chassis Weight

    Hello guys, I just wanna ask a question about the weight of a tubeframe chassis.
    What do you think would be the ideal weight for it? I am referring to NAERC kits
    and I also would like to know what exactly is the kind of steel are they using for
    the NAERC chassis? Is High-Tensile steel a good choice for building one?

  2. #2
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    It's mild steel, nothing special. The bare chassis without suspension will hit around just under 500 pounds.

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    I am using also a basic steel, 2mm thickness. Its more about chassis design, than steel strength. Same steel with correct shapes, can be 10x stronger. If U are using ultra strong steel, Use it only in the area where passengers are, and use not so strong in front and rear parts, as in the crash situation, they will bend, and crash will be more "smooth". It is not the speed what kills, it's the quick stop!

  4. #4
    thank you very much for the info guys. I'm also wondering how much in percentage is a Hi-Tensile steel more expensive than a mild/basic steel? Is it like double or triple the price?

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    I am not sure how much the difference is, but remember that cutting a ultra strong steel, is much different thing, than cutting a normal steel.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Tantukka View Post
    I am not sure how much the difference is, but remember that cutting a ultra strong steel, is much different thing, than cutting a normal steel.
    If I'm not mistaken, stronger steel is more brittle than normal steel right? What I don't quite understand is how could it be more brittle if it's stronger? Does this mean that stronger steel will less likely bend in crashes compared to ordinary steel but will be more breakable or brittle?

  7. #7
    Senior Member AdrianBurton's Avatar
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    Mild steel will deform (bend) a lot more before it breaks than Hi-Tensile steels.

    to give you an idea MS may bend 170* HTS would bend 60* then fail. (not real numbers just giving you an idea)

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    Stainless steel is not necessarily stronger than other steel. Go with 1018 mild steel as it will be easier to cut and weld and will actually perform better than using something like 4130, which is commonly called chrome molly.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobi1 View Post
    Best way is to use mild steel for the front and rear crumple zones, and medium-strenght steel (stainless steel) for the mid section and roll-cage. You can also use mild steel anywhere if you have properly designed chassis that will make up for the soft material. Very high-strength steel is not recommended as it's about 5 times harder than mild steel and tends to break after very small percentage of bend.
    Commonly available Stainless Steel, like 304 and 316, is no stronger than mild steel just better corrosion resistance. And unless you use "L" for low carbon Stainless the welds will crack easier than mild steel. You should use mild steel everywhere and if you want more strength in your roll over structure switch to 4130 DOM (drawn over mandrel) not welded seam tube. I agree with Eric (txbuilder).

  10. #10
    thank you very much mates =] these are great advice from you people =]

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