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Thread: Fiberglass Question

  1. #11
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    Latex gloves are awesome.

  2. #12
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    Of course I need fiberglass mat, forgot to list that lol :P
    We do have acetone, and single-use gloves (Those white ones - Will they work?) already. So I would need those?:
    - Polyester Resin
    - Hardener
    - Body Filler
    - Primer Filler
    - Release Wax

    - Sandpaper (I love sandpapers lol)

    - G
    elcoat
    - A Brush
    - A Roller

    And of course Fiberglass mat.

    So. A couple of questions: First of all, why do I need gelcoat and resin? Don't they do the same? I think having a company CNC a 3D model out of foam would be the best choice, What do I need to cover it with? I was thinking of tape, but since you know so many other chemicals/materials you may be able to suggest something to prevent if from melting that wouldn't loose details (like the tape would).
    Secondly, In the video they showed one thing called "Catalyst" that was added to the resin, I figured out this was a hardener. And then they used something they called "Hardener" with the body filler. But whereas the "Catalyst" was in liquid form, the "Hardener" was in some sort of paste. Are those two different? Do you need the liquid one or the "paste" one for gelcoat?
    And lastly, what's the difference between body filler, and primer filler? Do I need both?
    Thanks!

    Last edited by xengs; 06-17-2013 at 12:48 AM.

  3. #13
    Senior Member dman1409's Avatar
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    How To Mold Fiberglass & Composites 1 of 8 - YouTube

    Check out this series of 8 videos... Great explaination of the entire process!

    These helped me a lot... I also just started playing around with fibre glass...

    Body filler is paste.... 2 component... (2% hadener)

    Primer filler is a thicker primer... To fill up minor imperfections...

    Foam:

    Waterbased exterior house paint... When dry I apply body filler... Depending on what you are making you can add more layers so you can sculpt the desires shape..
    Last edited by dman1409; 06-17-2013 at 02:34 AM.

  4. #14
    Junior Member Rebelervi's Avatar
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    Posted this yesterday, apologies if going over old ground.

    A plug is usually required if you require a mold, although sometimes its possible to fabricate mold from wood/filler, or alike.


    Plug for rear custom seat:
    Name:  PlugsPlugsExample3_zpsc36b2862.jpg
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Size:  37.9 KB




    In addition:
    Eye protection.
    Eye wash.
    Breathing protection.
    Protective clothing/footwear.
    Syringes/Retail quality scales (I use 1% ~ 3% catalyst # Temp'/Pot life, weigh polyester , add catalyst by volume, although there are variations)
    Gloves, throw away, and re usable.
    Choppings/chopped strand/strands, for corners.
    Different from chopped strand matt, which comes in variations, I use 600 and split using thinner layers at first.
    Thermal properties of mold are worth considering, as are the working temperatures of any article.
    Also prefer to add color/pigment to Gelcoat, as it just seems to spread easier.
    Quality brushes for Gelcoat, or there is a spray system.
    Metal rollers are the bizz for larger/flatter areas.
    Mixing pots/ mixing sticks.
    If your shaping fiberglass, glass bubbles can added.
    Protective plastic sheeting/sticky tapes/blu tack/ card etc.
    More info:
    Buy fiberglass and composites supplies online UK - East Coast Fibreglass Supplies


    Best of luck.

  5. #15
    Senior Member MacGyver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xengs View Post
    Of course I need fiberglass mat, forgot to list that lol :P
    We do have acetone, and single-use gloves (Those white ones - Will they work?) already. So I would need those?:
    - Polyester Resin
    - Hardener
    - Body Filler
    - Primer Filler
    - Release Wax

    - Sandpaper (I love sandpapers lol)

    - G
    elcoat
    - A Brush
    - A Roller

    And of course Fiberglass mat.

    So. A couple of questions: First of all, why do I need gelcoat and resin? Don't they do the same? I think having a company CNC a 3D model out of foam would be the best choice, What do I need to cover it with? I was thinking of tape, but since you know so many other chemicals/materials you may be able to suggest something to prevent if from melting that wouldn't loose details (like the tape would).
    Secondly, In the video they showed one thing called "Catalyst" that was added to the resin, I figured out this was a hardener. And then they used something they called "Hardener" with the body filler. But whereas the "Catalyst" was in liquid form, the "Hardener" was in some sort of paste. Are those two different? Do you need the liquid one or the "paste" one for gelcoat?
    And lastly, what's the difference between body filler, and primer filler? Do I need both?
    Thanks!


    I would suggest you find a few fiberglass how to books and read them. This will give you a basic understanding of how it all works.
    Body fillers polyester resin, polyester gelcoat, polyester primer filler all have a lot in common. They are all polyester based materials. Which means they all need a catalyst (hardener) in order to cure. The cream hardener you were referring too that comes with body filler has a MEK base. MEK in liquid form is the catalyst used in all the other products. Typically added as 1% to 2% depending on the product and the room temp.
    It all seems confusing at first but is actually very simple. Pick up a good book and I’m sure you will gain the knowledge necessary to get you started. You tube can be very helpful to a point. Some know what they are doing, some don’t have a clue.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    I would suggest you find a few fiberglass how to books and read them. This will give you a basic understanding of how it all works.
    Body fillers polyester resin, polyester gelcoat, polyester primer filler all have a lot in common. They are all polyester based materials. Which means they all need a catalyst (hardener) in order to cure. The cream hardener you were referring too that comes with body filler has a MEK base. MEK in liquid form is the catalyst used in all the other products. Typically added as 1% to 2% depending on the product and the room temp.
    It all seems confusing at first but is actually very simple. Pick up a good book and I’m sure you will gain the knowledge necessary to get you started. You tube can be very helpful to a point. Some know what they are doing, some don’t have a clue.
    Yup all good advice. I started with a book from the library ( a building full of books you can read and even borrow for free), on how to build boats.
    I bleed styrene, bathe in acetone, and sparkle like a Cullen in the sunlight.

  7. #17
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    Thanks for your advice everyone!
    I'll see the videos when I have time, I'll try to to find a good book on Fiberglass as well.
    Thanks!

  8. #18
    Senior Member brada's Avatar
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    apply baby powder to your hands before going crazy...
    also doesn't hurt to apply it to other exposed skin.
    when u wash ur hands and face after.. USE ONLY COLD WATER, this will close ur pours.. hot water will open then and let the fibers in..u'll be itching for weeks

    Quote Originally Posted by dman1409 View Post
    What I alwas find anoying is the strands sticking to your fingers when there is some resin on them...

    Any tricks to prevent that?!? Appart from keeping your fingers clean... Lol

  9. #19
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    Well this is much right that it will give you the nice deals and must make your work easy to do.
    Gloves also take care of your hands and will must make them protected.

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