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Thread: Best body filler for fiberglass?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkman View Post
    Thanks for all the information, I will check the availability of the PCL primer in my area. One more question though, is it ok to spray the PCL primer over bare fiberglass, or must there be a layer of gel coat before spraying?
    If you can't find that PCL stuff in your area, Slick Sand by Evercoat is also a Polyester spray filler primer.

    Slick Sand Gallon

  2. #12
    Senior Member autopro's Avatar
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    PCL 901 is the best stuff I have ever used, I love it. What murcie-me said is 100% accurate.
    Pedro

  3. #13
    Senior Member murcie-me's Avatar
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    PCL will go over bare anything (fiberglass, metal, wood, foam, bamboo, chocolate) and stick permanently.
    Without talent experience is worthless

  4. #14
    Senior Member autopro's Avatar
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    Clean your gun right after you finish spraying otherwise if it sets up in there you will have to throw the gun away.
    Pedro

  5. #15
    I haven't read all the posts here, so my apologies if I am repeating anyone, but I have three suggestions. First is Duraglass. We used it for everything that needed a big fill. It has fiberglass in it and makes a very strong bond. The second is called feather fill. It is basically spray bondo. It is a catalyzed filler spray and no matter how thick you spray it, it's rock hard in twenty minutes. The third is evercoat. It comes in a top glaze for those tiny imperfections. and the solids in it are very fine, so it isn't sandy and fills tiny specs well. The bottle for that one has a top like a bendable straw.

    Evercoat

    But more importantly than any of that, is to properly prepare the surface to be fixed. The Countach kit I bought had a bunch of work that was right on top of the raw finished fiberglass. So two of the body panels popped of during driving and the rest were hanging by a thread. So I bought it damaged, knowing I could fix it well. The finished surface of glass is slick and slightly oily. So you have to break the glaze with sandpaper to give the filler material grip, or it will scab off in no time. Properly prepared surface will last indefinitely.

    Sorry again if that was long winded and if I re-covered someone making the same suggestions. I hope some of the info will be useful. I built show cars for years and these were tried and true methods.

    Peace,
    Gumby

  6. #16
    Senior Member brada's Avatar
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    what most people refer to as "bondo", is a name brand. General duty autobody fillers (no matter what brand) are all for the most part polyester based, and as such are 100% fiberglass complaint, being that most people use polyester resin.
    Polyester gel coats are also 100% complaint with fillers.

    The only resin that won't let you get a chemical bond of body filler is true epoxy resin. you cant adhere polyester to epoxy, but you can adhere epoxy to cured polyesters.
    Just like gumby69 said, prep of surface is key!
    We have been using evercoat for over 15 years and , slicksand as the high build surfacer, and we haven't had a single failure in that time. we've done over 25 show quality completes.
    good luck

  7. #17
    Senior Member brada's Avatar
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    also, all polyesters are porous and absorb water and humidity, that's why if you've ever seen an old project car left out in the elements for several years, you can typically chip the premier right off. it's also why its recommended to 'seal' fillers and high build poly surfacers with a epoxy based product due to the fact that it its non porous when cured and thermally stable.

  8. #18
    Senior Member murcie-me's Avatar
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    I dont think you are familiar with PCL.
    PCL primer is a "sealing" polyester/urethane based high fill primer. It does not absorb moisture or humidity, and does not need to be sealed (I just read the can I have).
    Also, there are many other factors that affect primer peeling/flaking off parts after years of sitting in the elements. The main reason a primer will flake off is because of shrinkage caused by UV light from the sun drying out and devastating the chemical structure of the primer. Another is differential expansion rates or the primer compared to the surface its applied to.
    I have had an old door card sprayed with PCL sitting back behind my garage for 7 years now, laying in the dirt and sometimes covered in mud. I washed it off a few weeks ago and the primer was still like new, nothing had peeled or cracked or chipped off.
    Without talent experience is worthless

  9. #19
    Senior Member brada's Avatar
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    Ur right MURCIE-ME, ive never used that product. We typically only use single conmpond sprayables.

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