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Thread: 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO scratch build

  1. #171
    Senior Member C5GTO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by G35Mike View Post
    Nicely done.
    Thanks Mike!
    Joel Heinke
    Be original; don't be scared of being bold!

  2. #172
    Senior Member C5GTO's Avatar
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    Post A/C vents

    Next up was to make provision for the A/C vents in the upper dash. I had purchased these nice looking billet aluminum vents, so it should just be a matter of cutting 3 holes and plopping them in, right? Well if you’ve ever done work inside a tightly packed dashboard you know it’s never that easy.

    I had purchased the most compact A/C unit available but given that the back part of the car’s engine sits under the dash and the A/C outlet ports sit at the top of the unit, there just isn’t much room for ducts.



    I wanted to space the vents across the dash such that the outside ones would be near the doors and the third one would be in the middle of the dash. It turns out the outside ones were easy in that I just needed to cut an oval hole in the dash for each, install vent, and connect them with 2.5 inch flex hose.

    The middle vent, now that’s where the head scratching fun started. The black Sharpie mark in the picture above is the center of the dash and I want to vent to go just above it. There was just no way a flex hose could be contorted to reach the vent without completely crushing it. To top it off, there’s no way to access that area behind the dash once the sheet metal is in place. The A/C unit completely blocks all access.
    So my best idea was to fabricate an aluminum duct that would butt up to the dash with the vent getting pushed/glued into the duct. I mocked it up in cardboard and masking tape to prove out my idea.




    My mock up showed that this duct could be fabricated from 3 pieces of sheet. First the top 2 pieces were welded together and test fit. I cut the plastic on the outside of the port to make for better airflow through the duct.



    I made good use of my Magnabend brake for the 3rd piece. Al 3003 .050 was used for the duct so bending it was fairly easy.



    I had to make bends in this piece after it was already welded in place.



    Once the duct was tacked together, it was time to try a trial fit. The first couple to tries told me the duct was too wide as the dash cover wouldn't fit in place. I had to break the tacks, trim some off, and re-tack for another trial fit. I used “plumbers putty” to check for clearance on the side where I could not get a direct visual. The putty squishes easily and holds its shape so I could do a clearance check after the dash top was removed again.



    Completed duct.



    Dash with A/C vents installed. The last remaining part is to install the radio in the area marked with a black rectangle.

    Joel Heinke
    Be original; don't be scared of being bold!

  3. #173
    Senior Member C5GTO's Avatar
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    Post Engine covers

    I decided to tackle an engine dress-up item. The C5 GTO has a late model Chevy LSx engine in it. Like a lot of modern engines, it has the ignition coils mounted on the valve covers. Needless to say, having 8 coils and associated wiring out in plain sight isn’t the look I desired for a replica of a 1962 car.



    The drivers side is even worse with the fuel lines, oil fill, and PCV hose snaking over it.



    My plan is to make aluminum covers to put this necessary but unsightly stuff out of sight. I’d like to emulate the original GTO cam covers so it isn’t so obvious this is a modern power plant. I started with a cardboard template and decided it would be well worth making a partial cover from aluminum prior to attempting the actual parts.



    I’m glad I did as it told me I’d need some tooling I didn’t have in order to make nice rounded corners. Namely, I’d need some T dollies to form the sheet over prior to welding. I’m making the T dollies now.
    Joel Heinke
    Be original; don't be scared of being bold!

  4. #174
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    Joel.

    When I did my valve covers I relocated the coils. I had read that the coils may overheat if enclosed. I had no way of assessing the veracity of that claim but I erred on the side of caution and relocated them.

    You may want to consider vent holes if you enclose the coils.

    For your consideration.

  5. #175
    Senior Member C5GTO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boy from Oz View Post
    Joel.

    When I did my valve covers I relocated the coils. I had read that the coils may overheat if enclosed. I had no way of assessing the veracity of that claim but I erred on the side of caution and relocated them.

    You may want to consider vent holes if you enclose the coils.

    For your consideration.
    Boy from Oz: Thanks for the warning. I did some research and was told these Chevy Gen 3 coils are designed to work even in high temperature conditions. The electronics are embedded in gel and resin to ward off the heat. I hope this is accurate as my custom covers will fit tighter to the heads than the factory plastic covers. I do plan to make oversized holes where the spark plug wires pass so hopefully this will provide enough ventilation. If not, I can always alter them if there's issues.
    Joel Heinke
    Be original; don't be scared of being bold!

  6. #176
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    Post Engine covers (continued…)

    In setting about to make some T dollies, I searched my metal scrap pile. I found a piece of 1” shaft in SS 304 and some ¼” flat SS. I had acquired a metal turning lathe a couple months ago and this gave me a project to try it out. I don’t have much experience running a lathe so tapering and rounding the shaft ends was a simple, but good confidence building start. I decided to make 2 T dollies, one short and one long.



    Now that I have to necessary tooling, I started on the simpler passenger side cover.



    Here’s what the top side of a real GTO V12 looks like. These cam covers are cast so fine detail is easier to achieve than with sheet.



    I don’t have a machine or tooling to replicate the 5 small fins across the top but I decided some small beads would serve as similar decoration. I had to add these while the sheet was still flat. I considered trying to emboss the Ferrari script emblem in the sheet but decided this wouldn’t provide the fine detail around the letters. So I located some Ferrari script badges which should show nice on top of the wrinkle paint finish I intend to use.



    Using a rubber hammer and T dollies, I started turning the sides over.



    From there, I mostly bent the sides by hand over the T dollies and then smoothed up the bends with the rubber hammer. I then clamped the seam with a vice grip and tack welded to form a rectangular box.



    Next step is a test fit prior to welding. More to come…
    Joel Heinke
    Be original; don't be scared of being bold!

  7. #177
    Senior Member C5GTO's Avatar
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    Post Engine covers (continued…)

    After welding up the corner seams, it’s time to add all the detailed elements into the cover. First detail was making an opening for the breather tube and ignition coil wiring to pass through. I made a quick and dirty hammer form in a 2x4, annealed the aluminum, and hammered in a louver like opening.



    The cover was then placed on the engine for a test fit. I found the supercharger intercooler coolant pipe hit on the rear upper corner.



    While it wasn’t absolutely necessary to address this, I thought it would be a nice touch to indent the cover and also make a rest for the pipe to sit on. I cut out the corner and welded in a small piece of aluminum to make a notch in the cover.



    Next was making holes for the spark plug wires to pass through. I could use a hole saw to do this but decided to try out another method instead. I marked a circle with a Sharpie and used a RotoZip to carve away the aluminum. It actually worked great and only required a little bit of cleanup with a file to make a smooth opening.



    The 4 upper holes are for the spark plug wires and 3 lower holes are for extra ventilation. This side of the cover isn’t visible so none of these holes can be seen.



    Here is the completed cover. It fits snug enough over the corners of the SOHC cam cover that I don't think it will need any fasteners to keep it in place.



    I plan to paint it with red wrinkle paint like is used on early Ferrari Testarossa engines. The paint work will wait until the drivers side cover is completed. The drivers side cover will be a little more difficult given it’s got more stuff around and over it.
    Joel Heinke
    Be original; don't be scared of being bold!

  8. #178
    Senior Member C5GTO's Avatar
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    Post Engine covers – Drivers Side

    While the basic forming of sheet to rectangular box for these engine covers was the same, I found a way to mess up my first attempt on the drivers side cover. Somehow I miscalculated on the sheet measurements and the cover ended up ¾” too long. Given the engine setup back, this put the cover too close to the firewall.



    The cover in the back of picture is 1st attempt and destined for scrap bin. The cover in the middle is the 2nd attempt and the right size. The partial cover in front is the mockup for where the rear corner needs to be altered to provide clearance.

    The C5 GTO engine bay is not all the wide and the brake fluid reservoirs are mounted on the firewall. I wanted to retain the rounded edge look even in the chopped off corner. So I added in a pie cut and rounded over the edged with a hammer and T-dolly.



    Given the irregular shape, the patch piece took some careful bending and fit up work prior to welding in.



    Here’s the corner after welding and metal finishing.



    More to come …
    Joel Heinke
    Be original; don't be scared of being bold!

  9. #179
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    Amazing work still my friend. Your updates never seem to disappoint. Well done on the covers. I kind of like them not painted myself and if the Ferrari name could be the only red part I think that would look great but that's just me.

    Well done and can't wait for the future updates.
    It's a never ending battle of making your cars better and also trying to be better yourself. - Dale Earnhardt Sr

  10. #180
    Senior Member Don's Avatar
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    Looks amazing Joel;

    Looking forward to more updates.

    Cheers
    Don
    308 Ferrari replica
    Prova Countach 5000QV

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