Page 19 of 20 FirstFirst ... 917181920 LastLast
Results 181 to 190 of 193

Thread: 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO scratch build

  1. #181
    Senior Member C5GTO's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Livermore, CA USA
    Posts
    119
    Quote Originally Posted by G35Mike View Post
    Amazing work still my friend. Your updates never seem to disappoint. Well done on the covers. I kind of like them not painted myself and if the Ferrari name could be the only red part I think that would look great but that's just me.

    Well done and can't wait for the future updates.
    Quote Originally Posted by Don View Post
    Looks amazing Joel;

    Looking forward to more updates.

    Cheers
    Don
    Mike and Don: Thanks for following and providing your input on this project. At times, it's hard to tell if there's much interest in a homebuilt project like this car on this kit car oriented forum. It's good to know there's people who find it interesting.
    Joel Heinke
    (Classic Roadsters Cobra, Ferrari 250GTO under construction)

  2. #182
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Annapolis Valley Nova Scotia
    Posts
    114
    Quote Originally Posted by C5GTO View Post
    Mike and Don: At times, it's hard to tell if there's much interest in a homebuilt project like this car on this kit car oriented forum.
    Don't worry Joel... I'm sure there's lots of interest! I find your build fascinating. In fact, I'd like to see more... especially if you could document a few more steps between the start and finish of a piece like the valve covers. What alloy are you using? How did you weld the corners? How did you round them out so beautifully? How did you make the ribbing? More more more!

  3. #183
    Senior Member C5GTO's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Livermore, CA USA
    Posts
    119

    Post Engine covers – Drivers Side (continued)

    The additional details needed for this cover are two notches to provide clearance for a fuel hose and supercharger intercooler coolant pipe. I marked and cut out openings and then verified the notched areas would provide adequate clearance.





    Filler pieces are cut, formed to fit, and then welded in place. I used TIG with very proud beads on top and bottom surfaces to ensure there would be plenty of metal for a nice edge.



    The two notches cleaned up nice after filing and metal finishing.



    I then dressed out the welds on the remaining 3 corners and here’s the finished cover.



    A final test fit to ensure it still fits well.



    Here’s before…



    … and after pictures with the new engine covers in place.



    It’s amazing how a little bit for shaped sheet aluminum can really clean up a bunch of ugly bits on the top of an engine.
    Joel Heinke
    (Classic Roadsters Cobra, Ferrari 250GTO under construction)

  4. #184
    Senior Member Don's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Victoria, BC Canada
    Posts
    3,337
    Very nice;

    I may have missed it earlier but how are you securing these to the tops of the engine? Are there small screws going into tabs or is it a pressure fit or something like that?

    Keep up the great work and updates for us.
    Don

    PS: When I see the difference I remember an old friend used to say all the time when building something. "Don't worry about it, the shingles will cover it....."
    308 Ferrari replica
    Prova Countach 5000QV

  5. #185
    Senior Member C5GTO's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Livermore, CA USA
    Posts
    119
    Quote Originally Posted by Bloozberry View Post
    Don't worry Joel... I'm sure there's lots of interest! I find your build fascinating. In fact, I'd like to see more... especially if you could document a few more steps between the start and finish of a piece like the valve covers. What alloy are you using? How did you weld the corners? How did you round them out so beautifully? How did you make the ribbing? More more more!
    I'll try to take more pictures but I often get going and forget to pick up the camera. Here's answers to given questions:

    Alloy: I used Al 3003 for these covers. 3003 is easy to weld, bend, stretch, and shrink along with polishing out to a nice shine. This is the alloy I use for everything except door and trunk skins. For that I use Al 5052. 5052 is a bit tougher (e.g. resists dings better) but it work hardens very fast. It needs to be annealed often if bent or shaped which is why I don't use it for anything shaped.

    Corner welding: I formed the rounded corners over a T dolly using a rubber hammer/mallet. I use rubber mallets as much or more than body hammers when shaping aluminum because they form the metal without thinning, stretching it and they don't leave hammer marks. On the rounded corners, the weld seam goes down the middle of the corner. I started by putting a quarter circle worth of bend on each edge over the T dolly. I then used bar clamps to pull the sides and ends of the cover down and thus pulling the metal on the corners together. With the clamps still in place, I evened up and got the corner to the desired final shape over the T dolly. I then attached a vice grip over the weld seam near the edge to keep it aligned flat during tacking. I welded these with a Tig using extra filler (1100 filler rod) just because it was easier than O/A gas welding in this situation. I fully welded on front and back sides because the front side bead would be completely removed during dressing. I think the real secret is getting the rounded corner shaped well prior to welding because you can't really work the metal in the corner after welding due to the weld bead that will be left on the backside.

    Dressing rounded corner welds: I filed down the weld beads with a variety of files. I use a very aggresive file to start for quick material removal. Going to finer files as the shape gets close and finishing up with a fine, single cut file. The only secret for a nice rounded corner finish (if there is one) is using emery cloth strip after filing. I used 1" wide 80 grit strips on these corners. This evens out the radius and removes any remaining file marks. With a bit of elbow grease you get a nice rounded corner with no sign of it having been welded.

    For dressing out the notches, I used an air powered die grinder with a carbide bit for initial weld bead removal. From there, it's files and sandpaper.

    Ribbing: The ribbing was done on a bead roll machine with a 3/16" half round bead roll.
    Joel Heinke
    (Classic Roadsters Cobra, Ferrari 250GTO under construction)

  6. #186
    Senior Member C5GTO's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Livermore, CA USA
    Posts
    119
    Quote Originally Posted by Don View Post
    Very nice;

    I may have missed it earlier but how are you securing these to the tops of the engine? Are there small screws going into tabs or is it a pressure fit or something like that?

    Keep up the great work and updates for us.
    Don

    PS: When I see the difference I remember an old friend used to say all the time when building something. "Don't worry about it, the shingles will cover it....."
    As of now, I don't think the covers will need anything to hold them in place. If they rattle, I may need to put some silicon underneath at the corners but they do fit fairly tight so I don't think they'll rattle.

    My original plan was to use a couple of studs on the coil pack mounts and then acorn nuts up top to hold the covers. But they fit snug enough I don't think that will be needed. Given that the spark plug wires go through holes on the sides and the hoses/pipes over the top the covers certainly can't fly off.
    Joel Heinke
    (Classic Roadsters Cobra, Ferrari 250GTO under construction)

  7. #187
    Senior Member 275NART's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    267
    Those covers turned out really well! I see your tip for using the T shaped dolly as well.

  8. #188
    Senior Member C5GTO's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Livermore, CA USA
    Posts
    119

    Post Engine covers finished

    My original intent was to finish the covers in red wrinkle paint leaving the Ferrari script in chrome. I received a suggestion from G35Mike to paint the Ferrari script in red and metal polish the covers. After noodling on this for a few days, I decided polished covers would look better and it would be worth the extra work. Well after a couple days of sanding and polishing, here’s what resulted.



    And the look after installed…





    I guess it’s the sign of a good polish job when lots of things (including the photographer) show reflecting off the surface
    Joel Heinke
    (Classic Roadsters Cobra, Ferrari 250GTO under construction)

  9. #189
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Land O' Lakes, Fl
    Posts
    1,395
    Wow, I'm humbled you took my suggestion and might I say those covers look fantastic. They have a real OEM look and feel to them. Amazing work!
    It's a never ending battle of making your cars better and also trying to be better yourself. - Dale Earnhardt Sr

  10. #190
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Gurnee, IL
    Posts
    13
    Beautiful work Joel.. I haven't posted here in around 9 years, but am so glad I peeked in here and see your project is still active! I was following your car on Last Chance Garage articles.. and now I've spent 6 hours today reading your posts and studying your pics.. I built my GTO I think around 2002 .. I think.. The projects have blended together in my head over the years. My first one was powered by a dry sump, race prepped V12 .. like most, it has evolved over the years. I'm building a second one now with Corvette suspension.

    Your metal work is wonderful and is giving me so many new ideas.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •