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Thread: How much hp can handle the transmission of the MR2???

  1. #1

    How much hp can handle the transmission of the MR2???

    Hello everybody,
    I've seen in the post of colato, a comment who says that the transmission of the MR2
    can handle even 800hp...
    Our friend colato says that, has checked this information and he says it's true...
    what's the opinnion of the rest of the group?
    is it true?
    can it handle this kind of horse power???
    what do you think about that?
    Last edited by George75; 02-01-2017 at 03:25 PM.

  2. #2
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    There is no universal rating for this, but the formula for resistance, which is the determining factor on it's breakage, is friction coefficient (how sticky the tires are) times contact patch (how fat the tires are) times downforce (how much weight is pressing down on the tires). In other words, that transaxle will handle all kinds of horsepower if it is tied to a bicycle tire with no weight on it, but very little horsepower if it is tied to a couple of wide sticky drag slicks with a 2,000lbs of downforce wing mounted above them.

  3. #3
    Senior Member MunkyKing's Avatar
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    The turbo box is WAY stronger than the NA one.
    I was running a JDM Camry 6 cylinder (with about 210bhp at the crank) through a used NA box and it didn't take much abuse.
    I understand that some of the Extreme Merci (MR2 kit) guys were running in the 400s (bhp) with the turbo tranny.
    I'm not sure anything with that much power is going to be fit and forget...

  4. #4
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    Transmissions aren't rated in horsepower... they're rated for torque capacity. For example, the GM F40 and F23 can handle 400 Nm (295 lbft) and 230 Nm (170 lbft) respectively. Those aren't ultimate values beyond which these transmissions will fail, instead they're maximum values to obtain a certain reliable life... probably the length of the warranty coverage.

    I'm not sure which year MR2 transmission you're talking about, nor what the various transmission were rated for, however I highly doubt Toyota would have put a high torque capacity transmission in any MR2 for two reasons. 1. Auto manufacturers choose the strength of a transmission based primarily on the curb weight of the car (2700 lbs at it's heaviest) and the engine power characteristics (typically 155 HP & 160 lbft), neither of which called for a high strength transmission; and 2. higher torque capacity means larger bearings, thicker materials, more gusseting, etc which all add extra cost. There wouldn't have been a good reason to use a stronger transmission than was needed for the light weight, low power, low cost car.

    That said, most new transmissions can handle a fair bit of abuse provided they aren't shock-loaded with high RPM clutch dumps. The more gradually the power is applied, the greater the torque it will be able to handle and the longer it will hold together. Old, half worn transmissions on the other hand don't usually stand up to much abuse at all.

  5. #5
    I was always impressed by this car, a nine second Lamborghini Jalpa with 690HP twin turbo LS1 running through a Toyota Camry automatic transmission.


  6. #6
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    According to this article: http://www.lsxmag.com/news/swap-insa...uns-in-the-9s/ the guy with the Jalpa started out with 500 HP and a manual MR2 transmission. At that power level he had to replace the clutch twice after only couple runs, likely because he had to machine down the diameter of the flywheel, and down-size the clutch and pressure plate to fit inside the small MR2 bellhousing. Another article stated that he swapped to the "highly customized automatic transmission with Camry bits" to address multiple driveline failures with the earlier system. Even with the Camry transmission, he switched to turbos from a supercharger to soften the impact of launches on the driveline. That should give you an idea what the limitations of the MR2 transaxle are, and just how "stock" his Camry transmission is (read: $$$)!

  7. #7
    I have not seen a question of how one would be driving the car and planning on putting that power to the wheels. If you gonna drive like my grandma or some of my neighbours for that instance on sunday sure the trans will serve you for much longer then you think. If you plan on driving like you stole the car and replacing tires every other run. I would say look at other transmissions or at least have lots of $$$ to either build something or getting replacements

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Bloozberry View Post
    According to this article: http://www.lsxmag.com/news/swap-insa...uns-in-the-9s/ the guy with the Jalpa started out with 500 HP and a manual MR2 transmission. At that power level he had to replace the clutch twice after only couple runs, likely because he had to machine down the diameter of the flywheel, and down-size the clutch and pressure plate to fit inside the small MR2 bellhousing. Another article stated that he swapped to the "highly customized automatic transmission with Camry bits" to address multiple driveline failures with the earlier system. Even with the Camry transmission, he switched to turbos from a supercharger to soften the impact of launches on the driveline. That should give you an idea what the limitations of the MR2 transaxle are, and just how "stock" his Camry transmission is (read: $$$)!
    this means that the Camry is much better than MR2...right? and besides that,as I've seen in the video, he had putted also paddle shift mode...isn't he?

  9. #9
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    I didn't say that. I said that the guy in the article Supercobra posted got better results with a highly modified Camry transmission than with what was probably a stock MR2 transmission. Whether one was better than the other would depend on the initial condition of either transmission, how you plan to use them, how long you expect either to last, how many off-the-shelf performance parts are available, and how much money you're willing to spend for customized parts and services like cryo-treating the internals. Otherwise expect the same results using the MR2 transmission as the guy with the Jalpa.

  10. #10
    Senior Member 275NART's Avatar
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    For big power you're best off going with a dog box/sequential transmission with straight gears.

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