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Thread: fiberglassing a flange

  1. #1
    Senior Member LP700-4's Avatar
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    fiberglassing a flange

    Just ordered some West system 105 epoxy and 205 hardner so I can start some fiberglassing on my kit. I am going to be separating the panels such as the rear bumper from the rear fenders and I looking for advice on the best way to create a flange. I have worked with fiberglass a lot in the past but mostly for bonding two panels together or when a panel needed to be lengthened or shortened. What I am looking for is some advice on the best way to make a flange on two panels so they could then be bolted together. I already know I have to rough up to surface first and to make a temporary edge for the fiberglass to be molded to on the first side. What I need is more on the layup of the glass to get a strong and permanent bond. I am not sure if I should start with the biggest piece to give the flange the most surface area to bond to and then lay up smaller pieces or start with a smaller piece and over lap with an inch or two inches for each layer....
    -Glenn

    "One day I had a bit of an argument with my friend Enzo Ferrari, who reckoned I wasnít able to drive a Ferrari, only tractors. Thatís when I got the idea into my head and told myself Ė Iíll make the cars myself from now on!" - Ferruccio Lamborghini

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    Following, as I'd like to do the same lol

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    http://www.fibreglast.com/category/Learning_Center Check out the link. Quite a bit of info there.

    No matter how you go about it, you are only going to have a mechanical bond. If you really want to be sure it's going to "stay put", you'd have to use rivets or screws or some type of permanent fastener then countersink them on the outside and "make them disappear" cosmetically. You should grind the edges where you want to ad the flange back quite a bit..like 2 or 3 inches at least, and make it progressively thinner toward the leading edges, then when you ad your flange layers, build it back up to where it was or even heavier inside. I'd start with a wide piece and gradually reduce additional layers, then when I had it close to where I want it, go wide again covering everything that's been added.

    Did this exact procedure when working with the old IMSA wide body molds from DGP. The entire rear clip was originally one piece, but I needed to have it sectioned, so had to create flanges on both rear quarters and the rear bumper, so they could be separated. Been using it that way ever since. I actually put the flanges on the outside of the mold so I can bolt metal flanges to them that extend into the interior of the molds, creating joining flanges in the parts laid up in them. Has worked out fairly well as far as I know. Wont work in your situation, as I'm guessing you are wanting to join finished parts that you intend to section.

    There are a number of ways to go about what you are trying to do, and I'm sure there will be others chime in with their suggestions/methods. Check out the fiberglast site, and keep in mind, there are really only two types of bonds with fiberglass....chemical and mechanical. Obviously, chemical is the best, as it makes it all one piece, but can only be achieved during initial layup. Mechanical is just what the name implies, and can be done anytime after the fact, but it has to be done correctly for it to be strong and permanent.

    Just one guys take on it.

    Good luck and let us know how it works out.

  4. #4
    Senior Member LP700-4's Avatar
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    Thanks TDW... I looked over hte links you s end but did not see anything that was covering best method of adding a flange... maybe I missed it?
    -Glenn

    "One day I had a bit of an argument with my friend Enzo Ferrari, who reckoned I wasnít able to drive a Ferrari, only tractors. Thatís when I got the idea into my head and told myself Ė Iíll make the cars myself from now on!" - Ferruccio Lamborghini

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    Can you post pictures of the parts and maybe show/explain a little more in detail what you'd like to do? Are you cutting apart panels that were laid up as a single unit? If so, then you are going to have to compensate for the width of whatever you use to cut them apart. If this is not what you are doing, then I think we need to see or at least understand better what you want to end up with. That's what I got from reading your original post. You are going to cut apart a one piece unit, then create flanges so they can be bolted together and be able to take them apart again at will.

    As I said, there is more than one way to attack the situation.

    Yea, I don't know if there's any info specifically aimed at creating flanges in the learning center of the Fiberglast site, but there is quite a bit of info on general composite construction and technique. You might look over the section on mold making, as I do think they hit on creating flanges to join sectional molds, which will be very similar in theory, but kind of going in the opposite direction, as the flanges for molds will be on the outside of the molds as opposed to on the inside for joining finished panels or parts.

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    Senior Member ITALIANKNIGHTRIDER's Avatar
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    http://www.madmechanics.com/forum/sh...028#post229028

    the method we used was separating the panels, we purchased a $16 hot glue gun and a bag of glue sticks from harbor freight ,we purchased 10 sheets of laminated (3 ply) poster board from wal mart, it is white paper on outsides and a foam core inside ,cut this in 2" wide strips ,it bends very nice ,rough up the fiberglass from the inside ( lightly sand it ) then hot glue the poster board from the outside edge then fiberglass from the inside of the part and on top of the poster board from the inside ,when it,s 3/4 dry, remove poster board template ,and you have a new fiberglass flange. we made fiberglass strips and added to the front fenders ,we re mold the front fenders , all new fenders have flanges.
    In the USA if you pay a company / person to start a plug, then it,s your plug and work ,it is not theirs to sell or trade !!

  7. #7
    Senior Member ITALIANKNIGHTRIDER's Avatar
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    in that picture the rockers are bolted to the rear fenders ,send me your phone no. and i can txt you all my pictures from my cell phone !!
    In the USA if you pay a company / person to start a plug, then it,s your plug and work ,it is not theirs to sell or trade !!

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    Senior Member ITALIANKNIGHTRIDER's Avatar
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    add a metal support flange (drill and slot holes ) from the chassis to support the fiberglass flange from the bottom, this will make the body and build solid & stable for hi way driving at higher speeds.
    In the USA if you pay a company / person to start a plug, then it,s your plug and work ,it is not theirs to sell or trade !!

  9. #9
    Senior Member RCR's Avatar
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    I've done pretty much the same as IKR when flanging my body panels. Usually there is a bit of step difference between the panel and the flange, so I build it up with smaller strips first, then overlay the wider ones that make up the actual flange. I do have the benefit of being able to screw straight through because of the belt line on mine. I suspect you will have a little more difficulty hiding the screws.

    Bob
    Bob custom '84 Fiero SE --->>> custom F408
    http://www.madmechanics.com/forum/cu...ilepic37_1.gif

  10. #10
    Senior Member superstang460's Avatar
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    RCR,
    I have questions about hard coating a foam model and may even have you do it for me.
    Contact me directly since I rarely log on here lately.
    Bobby
    superstang460@yahoo.com
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    5 out of 4 people are not good at fractions

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