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Thread: New Guy - New Question RE: Fiberglass Angle material

  1. #1
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    New Guy - New Question RE: Fiberglass Angle material

    Hello from very upstate NY..where Quebec, VT and NY meet.

    Installing fiberglass fenders on my 33 Chevy which is chopped, stretched and channeled so the fiberglass fenders and running boards require modification. That said I would like to purchase about 20 feet of 1" to 1-1/2" fiberglass angle to to be used for support and mounting brackets. They will be laminated into the current fiberglass parts.

    My question is what angle (composition) material do I need that would be compatible with the standard automotive fiberglass resin process?

    Here is one link I located:

    https://www.gamut.com/p/fiberglass-a...SABEgIpMPD_BwE

    Thinking I really need clear and raw (not painted) fiberglass? Any process suggestions and possibly material sources?

  2. #2
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    EDNY, those angles are polyester resin, very common. If your body is standard stuff, it is going to be polyester resin as well.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by 76mx View Post
    EDNY, those angles are polyester resin, very common. If your body is standard stuff, it is going to be polyester resin as well.
    OK Thanks...cutting away primary 90 degree mounting areas and want to be sure that the material will bond permanently into my panels.

    Also...with steel fenders the inner support brackets are riveted to the outer edge of the fenders, not going to take a chance and try that with fiberglass fenders...I'm sure they would crack. My idea is to bond steel mounting points on the bottom side of the fenders with exposed "eyes" to attach fabricated frame brackets?

    Any suggestions for glassing in brackets i.e. should I use flat or round steel stock? Don't want to but should I consider wood laminated in to attach brackets?

    Thanks again

  4. #4
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    EDNY, yes you need the reinforcing. Always remember that fiberglass has no mechanical properties at all. The best thing I ever found was cheap garden hose. Lay it in and let it follow all of the contours, put a strip of glass over it, and make a nice shaped beam.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by 76mx View Post
    EDNY, yes you need the reinforcing. Always remember that fiberglass has no mechanical properties at all. The best thing I ever found was cheap garden hose. Lay it in and let it follow all of the contours, put a strip of glass over it, and make a nice shaped beam.

    That sounds like a neat idea and may just use it for the majority of the fender(s) inner surface. Would like to laminate a small bracket to the fender so I can bolt it to a bracket from the chassis. Was thinking of using round steel probably in the 1/4" diameter range laminated to the inside of the fiberglass fender with a portion protruding with mounting eye drilled out to bolt to the frame bracket?


    These 1930's fenders catch a lot of air up front.

  6. #6
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    OK just received some DYNAFORM fiberglass angle gray 1/8" 1"X1" (Isopthalic Polyester Fire Retardant Resin (ISOFR) Fiberglass). It obviously has a coating on it that must be removed before attempting to attach it to my fiberglass body panels. Is the best method just to sand of the coating and do you recommend any process to prep fiberglass surfaces to be bonded?
    Thanks

  7. #7
    Senior Member Don's Avatar
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    Sand both the angle and the fender surface where you are going to bond to with 40/60 grit sandpaper. Make sure all surfaces are rough and no more shine anywhere.

    Adding pieces after the fact with fiberglass is now a mechanical bond vs the original chemical bond when the parts were made. The bond now relies on the resin getting a good grip between the pieces so rough is good and no shine so you know the wax has all been removed as best you can from the original pieces.

    Good luck
    Don
    308 Ferrari replica
    Prova Countach 5000QV

  8. #8
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    Thanks Don...I cut off a small section and tried both sanded and non-sanded areas...obviously the non-sanded separated easily. The sanded portion is locked nicely.

  9. #9
    Senior Member RCR's Avatar
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    EDNY,
    As Don said, rough everything up, but you didn't mention how you were bonding it together.
    I like to use SMC/FRP corvette panel adhesive from Durabond.

    Bob
    Bob custom '84 Fiero SE --->>> custom F408
    http://www.madmechanics.com/forum/cu...ilepic37_1.gif

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