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Thread: Modern-day Miura

  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by Havemurci View Post
    Watching in awe!
    Ditto!

    For what it's worth though, I found your last series of photos difficult to understand exactly what I was looking at. In fact, I still don't. Have you got a schematic of the Strickland chassis that you can post with an arrow showing the area you modified for the transaxle? If not, then a photo from further away would be good too.

  2. #102
    Senior Member C5GTO's Avatar
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    Arrow

    Quote Originally Posted by Bloozberry View Post
    Ditto!

    For what it's worth though, I found your last series of photos difficult to understand exactly what I was looking at. In fact, I still don't. Have you got a schematic of the Strickland chassis that you can post with an arrow showing the area you modified for the transaxle? If not, then a photo from further away would be good too.
    Sorry about that, I'm so close to the project that sometimes I forget to include a "big picture" shot to put the detail shots into perspective. Showing a chassis schematic is a good suggestion but I don't have one of those either. Here's a couple of pics showing the same area on the passenger side which is un-altered. The drivers and passenger side rear suspension and supporting chassis mounting areas are mirror images of one another.





    The vertical plate where the lower and upper A arms mount is what was changed on the drivers side. Hopefully this puts it into perspective. I'll also be posting more pics as I complete the drivers side alteration.
    Joel Heinke
    Be original; don't be scared of being bold!

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by C5GTO View Post
    Hopefully this puts it into perspective.
    OK... now I think I've figured it out. You've moved the vertical webbing that ties the upper and lower frame rails together, from inside the engine bay, to outside the engine bay. I went back to one of your first photos on the previous page and noticed a fine red ink line where you intended to cut it... though it looks like you changed your mind and cut it straight through.

  4. #104
    Senior Member C5GTO's Avatar
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    Post Chassis Mods for Transverse Transaxle (part 2)

    In this update, Iíll show the last steps in completing the modifications to the rear suspension mounts. These mods were required to provide clearance for the transverse transaxle.

    Iím using the same Loctite brand methacrylate based structural adhesive for bonding in this situation as was used on all the original glued joints in the chassis. I submitted a question to Henkel (parent company for Loctite brand) asking if there is a recommended ďgapĒ between the bonded aluminum pieces. The prompt response from the Henkel engineer was, ďno induced gap yields the best results.Ē

    So after spreading a thin layer of glue over entire surfaces of both pieces being bonded, I used lots of clamps to try to minimize the gap as much as possible. I had to quickly remove the glue squeezed out after clamping as the 15 minute work time glue sets up fast.



    After 24 hours to let the glue achieve full strength, hereís the result.





    The last step in the modification was to put the A arm mounts into double shear, i.e. mounted to chassis on both sides of the heim pivot point. While Iím confident they have the needed strength in single shear, putting them in double shear was easy, provides some extra rigidity, and could be done without adding much weight. Al 6061 angle in 2.5 inch by ľ inch stock was used to fabricate the mounts.



    These will be bonded to the frame rails using structural adhesive. I purposely made them a bit oversized to give plenty of surface area for the bonding joint.
    Joel Heinke
    Be original; don't be scared of being bold!

  5. #105
    Senior Member C5GTO's Avatar
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    Post Fuel tank installation

    Now that the fuel tank has passed leak testing, I decided it was time to install it in the chassis. The fuel tank mounts in the chassis backbone and occupies 100% of the space between the front and rear bulkheads. The fuel leak testing had bowed the tank sides a bit and I needed to push them back flat in order to slide the tank up into the chassis. The tank is held up by 3 sheet metal plates that also double as mounts for the coolant and A/C pipes. The ends on each plate are folded down and butted together such that the middle plate can be fastened to each end plate. Each plate end has holes in them to support the aluminum pipes that transfer vital fluids from the car back to front and vice versa.



    Each of the plates was raised with a floor jack during fastener preparation to ensure the pipe work would be above the level of the carís floor. I didnít want the pipes to be exposed for possible scraping when the car is driven over speed bumps. Each plate is held in place with four ľ inch screws and I elected to use Riv-nuts to receive the screws.



    The in-tank fuel pump top plate and fuel level sending unit (in shaded area further forward) stick up through the top of chassis backbone.



    Here is the in-tank fuel pump unit and foam baffling ready to be installed in the tank.



    The only remaining fuel tank detail is to fabricate a filler pipe and provision for a gas cap. Iíll leave that for a later date after more of the front body work and supports are figured out.
    Joel Heinke
    Be original; don't be scared of being bold!

  6. #106
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    Post Radiator Placement

    I decided the next project step is to figure out the radiator placement such that supporting chassis structures for the front clip can be fabricated. The radiator recommended by the chassis designer/builder, Charley Strickland is a 2 pass, cross flow with only an air bleed valve and no radiator cap that measures 26Ē wide by 19 ĹĒ tall. Charley normally orients the radiator straight up vertical in the other cars that use this same chassis. For the Miura though, the radiator needs to be angled forward in order to fit under the bodywork. Thatís not too surprising as the original Miuraís also have steeply angled radiators.

    I determined the only way to sort out radiator placement and angle is to mock it up. Iím not sure if a full sized spare tire will be used in my Miura but just in case, I needed to include it in the mockup.







    I didnít have most of the actual Miura measurements needed so I took them from the 1/18 scale model I have. For example, I needed to know the distance from front wheel center line to front lower body panel and height from ground for this panel. That way I could make sure the radiator could be located high enough such that it wouldnít scrap when entering parking lots. I also needed to know the distance to the forward most point on the front clip and its height from the ground. This would help me loft a line over the radiator top to determine how much it needed to be angled. Measurements from the model likely wonít be dead accurate but should be close enough for this radiator placement exercise.

    I used a couple of aluminum rulers clamped together to loft a simulated line at the middle of the front clip. The front of the car, i.e. most forward point on the front clip is only 15 ĺĒ off the ground. Yes, the Miura is a very low slung car. The wooden block with ruler attached is positioned so it simulates the front top of the car body. I determined the radiator will need to be placed at a 40 degree angle to provide clearance to the bodywork. The final test for the mockup was to make sure there was necessary clearance with the radiator for spare tire removal. That passed, so mockup successful.
    Joel Heinke
    Be original; don't be scared of being bold!

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