Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: Welding Type

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    12

    Welding Type

    I'm getting ready for my first build and I'm torn on some information that I have read. Everywhere I read, I can accomplish either the stretch of a chassis or tubular frame with a MIG welder. I spoke with two sources (a racer that built his own car and the other is a R&D fabricator for aeronautic industry), bot claim that MIG simply doesn't have the umph to penetrate the metal to create a strong weld that constantly have weight on it. Based on your builds, what have you used?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    746

    Re: Welding Type

    I'm using mig. building an airplane is different from building a car, there is more pressure subjected to an airplane that requires you to use the stongest welds possible, weight and strength is key. I've worked in both industrys

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    12

    Re: Welding Type

    The steel tube are usually .125 inch in thickness so I don't see why a decent MIG welder from say Lincoln with higher AMP couldnt do the job. I have done very few welds so I wasn't sure which direction to go and getting anything more then a MIG will kill my initial start up budget.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    168

    Re: Welding Type

    MIG does just fine with chassis building. A 220v MIG with flux will penetrate fine but you'll have an uglier weld than using a shielding gas. No need for anything special to build a chassis, just use good technique and preparation.

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    12

    Re: Welding Type

    Will this do the job or something more heavy duty?

    http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1...atalogId=10053

  6. #6

    Re: Welding Type

    Quote Originally Posted by Poormansride
    Will this do the job or something more heavy duty?

    http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1...atalogId=10053
    Hello,

    If you buy this youll end up regretting it within a few months of using it. Get a 220v gas welder that is rated as close to 200 amps as possible.
    Yes youll spend more money initially but a lot more cheaper in the long run because this is whats going to happen:
    Youll start welding your chassis and realize that its not coming out the way you wanted and realize that the welder is not up to par because you started researching and found a lot of smack talking about a flux welder.
    Youll throw the welder on craigslist and depend on it selling to buy another stronger one from Home Depot but will end up letting your neighbor borrow it and youll never see it again.
    Then you buy another one from Home depot a few months later and realize you made the same mistake but it just cost you more this time so the cycle starts again.
    You finally end up getting a decent Miller or Hobart that is used and realize that the work you put on the chassis with the little welders is not strong enough so you try to sell the chassis with no luck and then another year will pass.

    Believe me... wait and save your money and spend $1500-$2000 on a Miller with a tank. Im pretty sure ive hit the nail on the head with a lot of fabricators in this forum ;D

  7. #7
    Senior Member Don's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Victoria, BC Canada
    Posts
    3,414

    Re: Welding Type

    Joe at InlandExotics posted while I was typing pretty much the same thing. I suggest you listen to a guy like Joe as he has the experience and expertise you want to take notice of and listen to. Great post Joe.

    Don
    Now on to my original typed rant.....
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>.

    This looks like a 110V unit. Great for setting up lots of non structural welding and pieces together but if you are getting into chassis welding, you are going to want 220V unit that can get better amperage through into the metal and get you a better penetration. Again, it all depends on what you are welding together though. Main frame pieces, in my opinion require better skills and welding penetration than a 110v unit and rookie skills can provide.

    I use my 110v unit to tack everything structural together and then either have someone come into my garage and weld using TIG or a much more powerful MIG welding unit or send the pieces out to a welding shop I work with. It will depend on what parts I am making.

    My opinion only but my welding skills are not to the level I want to trust my life to so my 110V welder and my welding skills do not equate to me being comfy about welding together important pieces. Given I am not an experienced welder, I am most likely not getting the penetration properly that an experienced welder can do by knowing how. I would suggest you think through how you aer going to approach your frame build as well. I see in your post you have not done a lot of welding yourself so I would imagine you won't be making the best welds at first either.

    I suggest tacking everything together so it is in place and won't shift and then farm out your final welding to the experienced guys out there. I remember when I cut my frame for the stretch, I cut and set everything up by tacking it all together and then had a welder that has been welding oil rigs for 20 years come into my driverway with his 20' trailer loaded with a diesel generator and monster welder. He went with a 220V MIG and welded everything together for me. $200 well spent in my opinion. I would never have been able to produce the finished piece like he provided me. I am very comfortable that the frame stretch will not come apart on me. I did the same on my front and rear suspension pieces I built as well. I farmed those out to an experienced welder.

    Again, these are only my opinions but I would suggest you don't put your life in the hands of a budget decision. You will be driving these things around and getting crazy at least once during the driving so is your life worth coming into a corner too hot on a back road that your control arm or frame welds come apart at an inopportune time because you made a start up budget decision at the beginning of your build?????

    Spend the money on the items that will provide you safety and ease of your build as you will find many other things to spend your time and money on by the time your build is done.

    Good luck with your decision but keep safety in mind when building your project.

    My $0.02 worth anyway.
    Cheers
    Don
    308 Ferrari replica
    Prova Countach 5000QV

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    168

    Re: Welding Type

    ^agreed

    I use a Hobart Handler 175 with argon/co2 mix and though its a small welder its 220 and penetrates easily into up to 3/8. I found this one for 500.00 new and been pretty happy with it. Eventually will move into a larger TIG though

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    12

    Re: Welding Type

    Very good advise. I can't agree more. I tend to get in over my head with confidence most times. I definitely going to reconsider my approach on this project. Perhaps get the mini to do the tacking and have a professional come out to the house. I didn't think of that, too simple. So I guess Fiero here I come and space frame a later date. I just can't stop thinking how sexy the space frame looks but very grim when I'm 6ft under. Thank you Inland, Don & n8nod9it

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    1,126

    Re: Welding Type

    I'm a builder and you are going to get a lot of opinions. I TIG suspension components because it does produce a stonger weld but only because you can control the quality of weld better. You can control and "see" the penetration and run the keyhole. Now for tube chassis I MIG everything. The weld is strong enough and MIG is several times faster. Actually much faster. You need to stay with a 220 volt MIG in the 200 amp range. I suggest ESAB, Miller, and Hobart. I have a lincoln, it is an older one and it has been a workhorse for me. I also have an ESAB. BUT, when I visit my local National Welders Supply (Now AirGas), their repair service is FULL of newer Lincoln welders and when I asked he said he repairs ten Lincolns for every other brand. That could also mean that Lincoln sells ten times more....He said Lincolns made in the last 3 years seem to have the most trouble. I use the lincoln with 0.035 with CO2 and the ESAB with 0.023 with Unimix for thinner stuff.

Similar Threads

  1. Welding machines
    By nicktruman in forum Technical Discussion & Question
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 10-05-2011, 07:41 PM
  2. Need advice - welding tools
    By sc80 in forum Technical Discussion & Question
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-16-2009, 04:33 AM
  3. Plastic Welding.
    By James_Bond_007 in forum General Kitcar Chat
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-07-2004, 02:23 AM
  4. Anyone have a few years of TIG welding experience?
    By dcox in forum General Kitcar Chat
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-09-2004, 10:53 AM
  5. Welding - Safe???
    By newcomer in forum Technical Discussion & Question
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-18-2004, 04:18 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •