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Thread: What is everyone using for wall thickness on a square tubing chassis? 2"x2"x? 2"x3"x?

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    Senior Member Bottlefed's Avatar
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    Smile What is everyone using for wall thickness on a square tubing chassis? 2"x2"x? 2"x3"x?

    What is everyone using for wall thickness on a square tubing chassis?? Ill be starting with 2"x2" , what wall thickness would be adequate? 1/8" or 3/16" for the main frame and support? I know this has been discussed before, but id really like an update of opinions... thanks in advance!!!

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    Senior Member Bottlefed's Avatar
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    Please..........

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    Senior Member AdrianBurton's Avatar
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    That should be determined by the chassis design and the location of the tubes.....

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    I have 3 types of tubes 1x2 and 1x1.5 which are .120 last one 2x2 which is in engine bay is .196 reason for it is that its main beams for engine support and lower control arms for drive wheels.

    I know some will say that its way to heavy, but I like to have piece of mind that it will not bend or flex. Whith the chassis not having any sheet metal not suspension components I can still lift by hand either side of it. So in my eyes its not heavy at all.
    Last edited by chimaera; 03-13-2012 at 05:03 PM.

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    Senior Member rapid transit's Avatar
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    bottle

    you're going to have to ride in it!

    go down to metal supply place and look at it.

    start with .063 wall and then go up.

    if you stay light and it works your a great designer.

    if it folds up on you then everybody points and laughs.

    Have A Nice Day!

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    Senior Member Bottlefed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tallon View Post
    Hello I'm not sure but in the chassiworks plans it uses different thicknesses and dimensions all over depending on the area
    The mains ones used with the chassis are .095 and .120 wall thickness using 3x2,2x1,1x1,2x2,1.5x1.5 so I had each of those in both thicknesses pretty much.
    It seems some people like to go with a bigger thickness though, or maybe .120 for everything but I didn't.
    And hows the flex? if any? is it still very rigid.? The chassis works look like there made of thicker material.
    Quote Originally Posted by chimaera View Post
    I have 3 types of tubes 1x2 and 1x1.5 which are .120 last one 2x2 which is in engine bay is .196 reason for it is that its main beams for engine support and lower control arms for drive wheels.

    I know some will say that its way to heavy, but I like to have piece of mind that it will not bend or flex. Whith the chassis not having any sheet metal not suspension components I can still lift by hand either side of it. So in my eyes its not heavy at all.
    I think this will be the route ill go but maybe using the 3/16 on the entire lower floor pan. Im realy not worried about the weight, Id rather it ride a little smoother and be safer and rigid as possible.


    Thanks all for the advice and opinions...I went to the metal shop today and eyeballed everything and I have a route to follow now.
    Quote Originally Posted by rapid transit View Post
    bottle

    you're going to have to ride in it!

    go down to metal supply place and look at it.

    start with .063 wall and then go up.

    if you stay light and it works your a great designer.

    if it folds up on you then everybody points and laughs.

    Have A Nice Day!
    This is the scenario ill be trying to avoid....lol Thanks for the advice

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bottlefed View Post
    And hows the flex? if any? is it still very rigid.? The chassis works look like there made of thicker material.

    I think this will be the route ill go but maybe using the 3/16 on the entire lower floor pan. Im realy not worried about the weight, Id rather it ride a little smoother and be safer and rigid as possible.


    Thanks all for the advice and opinions...I went to the metal shop today and eyeballed everything and I have a route to follow now.
    This is the scenario ill be trying to avoid....lol Thanks for the advice
    wow dude easy on the over kill. 3/16 ?? thats massive, like m1a1 weight. kidding its your money spend it how you want. but over the last couple of decades one thing ive learned is that just when you think you cant go any lighter someone comes along and and will make it lighter and it will work. ive been building my chassis with my nascar experince in mind. the rules are.

    at least .090 seamless tubing for all chassis bars. .083 and .090 on the frame rails. before the cot cars we used to use .065 to .083 on the frame rails. 120 wall is over kill on your chassis bars. problem is .090 is less common and usually way more exspensive then the .120, however we are are not traveling at them high rate of speeds with the massive impacts that do take place. .083 tubing is just fine . i use it alot and if you mic out your fireo chassis on some of it thickness. you will find it to be simular in thickness. i do use 120 on my frame rails because i want to lots of miles put on my chassis without issues but the majority is .083i used to use 14 ga steel for my floor sections but i have since done away with that as well i use 16 gage or if someone wants i will use 18. but i also do not have big areas to fill in with sheet metal i run 22 everwhere else unless someone wants lighter. also rectangular tubing if used properly can be stronger than square. for instance .75x 1.5 can be just as strong as a piece of 1.5 x 1.5 square. so when you do cut the size down you want the longer side to be doing the work. look at a tractor trailer (with the box trailer) if you noticed and im sure you have, it is taller than wider and if you go inside you will see thier is not much to the framing. simply put its the design it would take alot more to bend up and down. which what the load is wanting to do..

    has anyone ever noticed that the red lights are always longer than the green lights at traffic signals. damn aliens

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    Senior Member Bottlefed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cliffscustomfab View Post
    wow dude easy on the over kill. 3/16 ?? thats massive, like m1a1 weight. kidding its your money spend it how you want. but over the last couple of decades one thing ive learned is that just when you think you cant go any lighter someone comes along and and will make it lighter and it will work. ive been building my chassis with my nascar experince in mind. the rules are.

    at least .090 seamless tubing for all chassis bars. .083 and .090 on the frame rails. before the cot cars we used to use .065 to .083 on the frame rails. 120 wall is over kill on your chassis bars. problem is .090 is less common and usually way more exspensive then the .120, however we are are not traveling at them high rate of speeds with the massive impacts that do take place. .083 tubing is just fine . i use it alot and if you mic out your fireo chassis on some of it thickness. you will find it to be simular in thickness. i do use 120 on my frame rails because i want to lots of miles put on my chassis without issues but the majority is .083i used to use 14 ga steel for my floor sections but i have since done away with that as well i use 16 gage or if someone wants i will use 18. but i also do not have big areas to fill in with sheet metal i run 22 everwhere else unless someone wants lighter. also rectangular tubing if used properly can be stronger than square. for instance .75x 1.5 can be just as strong as a piece of 1.5 x 1.5 square. so when you do cut the size down you want the longer side to be doing the work. look at a tractor trailer (with the box trailer) if you noticed and im sure you have, it is taller than wider and if you go inside you will see thier is not much to the framing. simply put its the design it would take alot more to bend up and down. which what the load is wanting to do..

    has anyone ever noticed that the red lights are always longer than the green lights at traffic signals. damn aliens
    Wow thanks Cliff... Thats alot of useful information. I really appreciate it! Ill be getting started soon!

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    Senior Member Bottlefed's Avatar
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    Hey Cliff... One more question.. U using mild steel or chromoly.. I have access to both but the chromoly is 3x the cost. Please lmk thanks Jim

  10. #10
    Senior Member rapid transit's Avatar
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    bottle

    chrome moly is stronger.

    mild steel is easier to work with.

    you have to decide on what kind of

    loads the frame will be dealing with.

    Have A Nice Day!

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