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Thread: Widening the wheels on Lamborghini replicas

  1. #1
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    Widening the wheels on Lamborghini replicas

    I just had a conversation with my mother's boyfriend about this. He pointed out that the Lamborghini's wheel base is much wider then on the fiero. I looked it up and discovered it's a whopping 10 to 11 inches, depending on the model!

    That's hardly an unnoticeable difference in width. So how do you do it?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Jbrown's Avatar
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    well you have to widen the front track and the rear you can widen or use a deep dish wheel with proper off-set , or even suspension change from HT Motorsports which is a good wya to go, I worry with the deep dish wheels the wear on lower ball joint... but with wide track rear you have to find longer axles also..
    Last edited by Jbrown; 06-03-2012 at 09:22 PM.

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    Senior Member VF1Skullangel's Avatar
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    Wheel spacers.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Jbrown's Avatar
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    personally would not even consider wheel spacers an option.... I know several use them but it puts to much strain on the suspension and turn radius sucks....

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    Where do you get the rear axels?

    Front suspension is going to be a pain but something I can save up for.

    I don't know much about cars but wheel spacers doesn't sound like a very good idea to me. That sort of thing creates allot of reliability and durability problems in firearms. I can't imagine it not being the same with cars.

    I'm starting to see what you guys mean about these things costing a fortune. Even so, looking at my resources, the biggest obstacle still appears to be getting the car and getting it stretched.
    Last edited by ronin; 06-03-2012 at 11:13 PM. Reason: added info

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    Spacers and different offset wheels on the rear is ok

    Spacers on the front is a problem if too large , that's why many people buy a wide track front suspension

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fauxrrari View Post
    Spacers and different offset wheels on the rear is ok

    Spacers on the front is a problem if too large , that's why many people buy a wide track front suspension
    Fulcrum effect?

    Won't this mean I'll be changing stuff out all the time?

  8. #8
    Senior Member am33r's Avatar
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    Ronin. You need to consider two things.
    What is the outer huh-to-hub distance on the Fiero front? And on the Fiero Rear?
    What is the Kit Width at the front wheel? And at the Read wheels?

    After that you can solve the problem with 1" spacers in the front, and 2" spacers in the rear.
    Then you choose a 3-piece wheel for the front and a 3-piece wheel for the rear to compensate for the difference.

    Pm me the info on the hub-to-hub distance and total kit width. I will work out an example of suitable wheels.

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    Thanks. I am away from home and using my laptop. I'll bookmark this on my main computer when I get home so I can come back to this. I am highly self-confident when it comes to aesthetics but when it comes to car mechanics outside of stuff like doors and such, the only thing I am self-confident in is my lack of knowledge. I am really at your mercy in this area.

    I'll be a little more comfortable working with those numbers when I have a Fiero in my position and a real auto mechanic working with me in person. Remember that I have been in some very bad car accidents and have a scientific understanding of the inner workings of firearms, as well as the cause of firearm failures. ( here's a glimpse in to my world http://glocktalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1171943 ) Bad car accidents + understanding the intricacies that cause or prevent major mechanical failures in a different field = the ideal combination for making someone very cautious about tinkering with automobiles under the hood.

    I'll give you that info, but I doubt I'll know enough about what I am doing to know I have that info myself for a month or 2.
    Last edited by ronin; 06-04-2012 at 03:12 AM. Reason: general fix

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    If you have been in serious accidents and are concerned about safety , a kit car based on a cut and stretched 20 year old car is probably the least safe car on the road . You should know that almost all cars from even 10 years ago, let alone 20, would get 0 star insurance institute safety ratings in a crash.

    Now combine that with the fact The chassis of a kit car is cut and stretched (ever seen a salvage car in a serious accident where the front or rear clip falls off?) plus all safety systems like door intrusion beams etc are removed , and a kit car is the weakest and most unsafe vehicle on the road

    Those of us who own them realize that, and we don't try to delude ourselves into thinking that if the welds and extensions are robust it will be as safe as a factory designed car.

    There is a reason roblp640 warns in his eBay ads that if you try driving a kit car in the same way you would drive a real exotic car , you'll kill yourself .

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