Page 1 of 10 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 97

Thread: Mad mechanics best tips thread

  1. #1
    Senior Member MacGyver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    3,043

    Mad mechanics best tips thread

    Building a kitcar/replica can be a challenging experience. It doesnít matter if itís a simple kit that was designed for a particular donor car or a more (make it fit) type of build. You will be faced with many obstacles. Such as building or fitting a powerplant, suspension, bodywork, paint, interior and a whole lot more.
    So, I thought I would start a thread on tips. With all the builders we have on the forum Iím sure everyone has a good practice tip to share. It may be something that has been passed down through the years or just something you figured out on your own.

    Letís see how creative you guys really are!

    To kick this off, Iíll add a couple
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  2. #2
    Senior Member MacGyver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    3,043
    Bondo and Duraglass tip

    Iím sure every one has an old can of Bondo or Duraglass that is too stiff to use anymore. Add a few drops of Stryene to that stiff ball you dug out of the bottom of the can. It will be creamy and smooth and just like new again. You could also use fiberglass resin instead of stryene but it will make your filler more brittle.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  3. #3
    Senior Member MacGyver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    3,043
    Guide Coat tip

    When blocking your panel an old practice was to lightly mist a little black lacquer over your primer to help find your low spots when blocking your panel. Some manufactures such as 3m came up with another product called Dry guide coat. Which is basically a carbon black powder that you wipe over your primer with their included applicator pad. It does work well because it will not clog up your fine sand paper like paint does.

    Here is the tip!

    Why spend $30.00+ for a fancy 3M product when you can open up an old copier or laser printer cartridge, dump the black powder in a can and apply it with a cheap sponge.

    What ever you do - don't drop the container!
    Attached Images Attached Images   
    Last edited by MacGyver; 01-28-2013 at 12:22 PM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Quso's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    327
    To seal foam and not to spend big $$ here is how ive done it

    I layed 2 layers of carpenters glue then thin layer of drywall mud after that 2 layers of regular house hold pain and then finally 2 layers of automotive primer sending required between each step

    Use yelow glue white one doesn't send as good

  5. #5
    Senior Member MacGyver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    3,043
    This one is so simple. I wish I knew about this a long time ago.

    Old masking tape issue......

    Instead of tossing an old roll of masking tape away. Put it in the microwave for 10 - 12 sec. and it's just like new again.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Hook of Holland, Netherlands
    Posts
    264
    for making a foam body plug, instead of sawing all the excess foam away, use a hot wire cutter. since theyre not widely available here i just took a electric quitar string, made a frame for it, and hooked it up to a 12v adapter. cuts very clean, fast, and doesnt make any mess at all. yet since you're melting foam. its best to use a respirator.

  7. #7
    Senior Member MacGyver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    3,043
    Quote Originally Posted by mr. K View Post
    for making a foam body plug, instead of sawing all the excess foam away, use a hot wire cutter. since theyre not widely available here i just took a electric quitar string, made a frame for it, and hooked it up to a 12v adapter. cuts very clean, fast, and doesnt make any mess at all. yet since you're melting foam. its best to use a respirator.
    That's a good idea. I'm still finding little bits of foam throughout my garage from sawing and sanding it years ago.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Hook of Holland, Netherlands
    Posts
    264
    a thing i find to be very usefull when doing actual mechanic work instead of body work: a small tube of secondglue in my toolbox. whenever i need to install a bolt in lets say a deep shaft, i just put a very tiny drip of superglue inside the allen or torx head, immediately insert my tool so it sticks to it so i can insert it without repositioning it like 5 times. iknow nowdays we have magnetic tools, only they dont work on every bolt.

  9. #9
    Senior Member MacGyver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    3,043
    Metal cutting TIP

    To cut heavy metals I use a table saw that is designed for wood. I use the DeWalt 7 inch .045 metal/stainless cut off disks from Lowes. The trick is to use a thin disk. If you try and use the thicker ones they throw off to much sparks and heat. Plus the motor has to work very hard to cut anything. I bought a cut off saw a couple of years ago but returned it because my table saw works so much better. The only issue there is with the DeWalt disks is they have a 7/8 arbor instead of a 5/8 so you will need to use an adapter. I just found a piece of pipe that was 5/8 ID and 7/8 OD and cut off a little slice. Worked like a charm and I didn’t have to go back to the hardware store.


    For cutting aluminum I use a standard fine tooth blade for plywood with a little ATF rubbed on the blade. That helps to keep the metal particles from sticking on the teeth.
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    273
    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    Metal cutting TIP

    To cut heavy metals I use a table saw that is designed for wood. I use the DeWalt 7 inch .045 metal/stainless cut off disks from Lowes. The trick is to use a thin disk. If you try and use the thicker ones they throw off to much sparks and heat. Plus the motor has to work very hard to cut anything. I bought a cut off saw a couple of years ago but returned it because my table saw works so much better. The only issue there is with the DeWalt disks is they have a 7/8 arbor instead of a 5/8 so you will need to use an adapter. I just found a piece of pipe that was 5/8 ID and 7/8 OD and cut off a little slice. Worked like a charm and I didn’t have to go back to the hardware store.


    For cutting aluminum I use a standard fine tooth blade for plywood with a little ATF rubbed on the blade. That helps to keep the metal particles from sticking on the teeth.
    Be very careful with these methods, as these wood saws aren't designed to catch hot metal shavings and won't be able to stop kick back from that type of material. I very nearly lost a thumb doing this because the material kicked up and shattered the plastic shield, and tryed to bite into the material and pull my hand into it. Luckily it didn't get spray my face with schrapnel, and it didn't get my hand into it, but it got as close as I ever have to loosing body parts. So be prepared..........

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •