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Thread: Use heat on the fiberglass?

  1. #1
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    Use heat on the fiberglass?

    I ask an opinion. Is advisable to use on fiberglass heading to make it flexible enough to model it correctly? I used this method and it worked, I need to know if is wrong to do so? It can ruin the fiberglass?can I use the same method as in the other parts?

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    Any suggestions will be appreciated.
    Last edited by Beny A; 06-22-2014 at 03:31 AM.

  2. #2
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    Maybe my question does not make sense, my English and poor. The point that I was no longer indicated by the arrow up to 7cm and I could not connect with the rear skirt, after warmed up it was pretty soft so I was able to lower it in the right place to stand in line with the rear skirt. For me it is the first time working with fiberglass and I need to be recommended by those who have more experience. I accept the criticism (I used the just method to do this?)

  3. #3
    Senior Member CMI-Cars's Avatar
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    Hey Beny
    Havent tried it myself, but have read about in diffrent treads around diffrent forums.
    The one tread I could finde atm with pictures is this one:
    The Miura project begins - Pennock's Fiero Forum

    I cant see that it should heart anything, by warming it up and get into shape.
    But was is me, I would do like the guy in the link, reinforce the area you have bin re-working.

  4. #4
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    CMI-Cars Thanks for the suggestion and link

  5. #5
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    We have tried doing it with our cars fiberglass repair tht key is timing to avoid any damage on the material it self.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Don's Avatar
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    I use a heat gun on some of my parts to help pull the sides back out since fiberglass will shrink when curing. I keep the gun moving on the part so I don't keep it in one spot for long and keep pressure on the part I am trying top move at all times. I keep the pressure on the part until it is cooled down to easily touch. If you remove the pressure, the part will shrink back to where it started.

    Don't overheat the fiberglass to where it starts to smell of fiberglass as you are getting close to burning it and then you have more repair work to do.

    One unfortunate side effect though is that the tiny air bubbles under the gel coat that every part has, will expand and you will get bumps in your gel coat. You will have to sand those back down and the large ones you wil need to grind out and fill with bondo.

    Just remember to not heat it too much that you burn it.

    Cheers
    Don
    308 Ferrari replica
    Prova Countach 5000QV

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by guruno View Post
    We have tried doing it with our cars fiberglass repair tht key is timing to avoid any damage on the material it self.

    Thanks guruno.
    I tried to force it to put together but useless, I was tired lunge for the hours of work,
    and time spent on this build. (I asked for an opinion in my thread, no answer) So I looked for the shortest path using heat, without thinking of the consequences.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don View Post
    I use a heat gun on some of my parts to help pull the sides back out since fiberglass will shrink when curing. I keep the gun moving on the part so I don't keep it in one spot for long and keep pressure on the part I am trying top move at all times. I keep the pressure on the part until it is cooled down to easily touch. If you remove the pressure, the part will shrink back to where it started.

    Don't overheat the fiberglass to where it starts to smell of fiberglass as you are getting close to burning it and then you have more repair work to do.

    One unfortunate side effect though is that the tiny air bubbles under the gel coat that every part has, will expand and you will get bumps in your gel coat. You will have to sand those back down and the large ones you wil need to grind out and fill with bondo.

    Just remember to not heat it too much that you burn it.

    Cheers
    Don
    Hey Don is exactly just what is happened to me, thank you for this information I've taken a weight I can now continue. You guys are great thanks for all the answers.

  9. #9
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    I agree another way to prevent burning is using a wet sponge or towel and wipe it to the effected area as you use the heat gun.

  10. #10
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    I used this method on the tailgate with a heat gun standart. I was very careful to heat the entire side in the distance. No burning smell, no bubble gel coat this time. I'm really happy with the results. I show you some pictures next, I removed the rear ends to secure it. You guys have saved me a lot of headaches and money Lol
    Last edited by Beny A; 06-24-2014 at 09:28 AM.

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