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Thread: Resin selection...

  1. #1
    Senior Member LP700-4's Avatar
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    Resin selection...

    I need to get more resin for my build. Does anyone have a good recommendation? I need it to repair parts that already exist on my Inspire lambo kit. I think he used Polyester resin but not sure. This resin will also be used for make a few molds and also pull parts. LOW to NO ODER is very important as working with the polyester resin stunk up the garage and house really bad.

    I found these but never used either one. My experience so far is with Polyester.

    http://www.clcboats.com/shop/product...oxy-resin.html

    http://www.westsystem.com/ss/product-selection-chart
    -Glenn

    "One day I had a bit of an argument with my friend Enzo Ferrari, who reckoned I wasnít able to drive a Ferrari, only tractors. Thatís when I got the idea into my head and told myself Ė Iíll make the cars myself from now on!" - Ferruccio Lamborghini

  2. #2
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    You are going to get a lot of opinions. Beware of those that "read" something and think they're an expert. If you are repairing or modifying, the most important issue is bond strength. Use epoxy.

  3. #3
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    I agree Epoxy is the best adhesive and will make a strong repair, however it's not necessary. What's more important is how you do the repair, for example if you had a crack then you'd feather the crack out almost to the point of going through the piece, then you'd glass over it, then feather in from behind the repair and glass in from the back as well. Never fibreglass over a smooth surface, always key the surface first, I find a 40 grit flappy disk ideal for this. Anyway that's not really what you were asking lol. If odor is a problem why not do it outside?

    Regards,
    Justin

    4 years doing this for a living

  4. #4
    Senior Member MacGyver's Avatar
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    If your looking for odorless, go with the epoxy. You could do it in your living room. The drawback is cost and curing time.

  5. #5
    Senior Member LP700-4's Avatar
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    Thanks guys, I am going to order some epoxy resin after doing a little more research on which one to get. Since my garage is directly below my house, the smell inside using poly in the winter time with the garage door closed is awful. So if I want to do any glass work during the very cold winter (0 degrees outside at times) then Epoxy it is. In the summer I can glass outside so the smell of poly is not an issue.
    -Glenn

    "One day I had a bit of an argument with my friend Enzo Ferrari, who reckoned I wasnít able to drive a Ferrari, only tractors. Thatís when I got the idea into my head and told myself Ė Iíll make the cars myself from now on!" - Ferruccio Lamborghini

  6. #6
    Senior Member MacGyver's Avatar
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    Being that cold the epoxy will take a very long time to cure. I mean a very long time. At the very least choose a fast hardener.

    http://www.uscomposites.com/epoxy.html

    http://www.aeromarineproducts.com/

  7. #7
    Senior Member LP700-4's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    Being that cold the epoxy will take a very long time to cure. I mean a very long time. At the very least choose a fast hardener.

    http://www.uscomposites.com/epoxy.html

    http://www.aeromarineproducts.com/
    MacGyver, I now have a torpedo heater in the garage so it will be much warmer in there then outside so temp shouldn't be an issue. I should have mentioned that earlier.

    Thanks for the links. I am going to get some West System 105 epoxy to start with since I have a store 30 minutes away that stock it. After this gallon is gone I may try the UScomposities epoxy.
    -Glenn

    "One day I had a bit of an argument with my friend Enzo Ferrari, who reckoned I wasnít able to drive a Ferrari, only tractors. Thatís when I got the idea into my head and told myself Ė Iíll make the cars myself from now on!" - Ferruccio Lamborghini

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    If you are repairing a part or mould that is made with Polyester resin then you should use the same resin not epoxy.

  9. #9
    Senior Member newtomm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by racecomp View Post
    If you are repairing a part or mould that is made with Polyester resin then you should use the same resin not epoxy.
    X2 I agree completely ! Use the same resin as the part is made with ! Find a way to exhaust the smell out of your work space and keep it some what warm until you can close up the exhaust . Make sure to grind out the repair area from the back side, and then make the repair using small pieces to begin with and make each layer (or patch ) slightly larger so you get more bond area . DON'T use a different product because it doesn't smell, Just ventilate your work area. A good electric heater is safer than a torpedo heater !

  10. #10
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    There are only two types of bonds in composites. Cross link and mechanical. The reason to use the same kind of resin is to achieve a cross link bond. Polyester is fully cured and will not cross link after a few days. So, all that is left is a mechanical bond. Unmodified polyester resin has a very, very poor mechanical bond. That is why when you look at a boat for instance, even though the boat is made of polyester, they do not use polyester to bond in the stingers, or the upper deck to the hull. All of these have "lock up tight" and there are no free molecules to cross link with the new polyester. Epoxy has a very high mechanical bond strength but will require higher temps than what you are talking about. Like I said there will be a lot of opinions but there is no valid reason to use the same resin system unless you are looking to cross link to the previous resin which would have to occur within 48-72 hours, max. A lot of my parts are built with ISO/DCPC hybrid (isophthalic polyester/dicyclopentadiene) and it will not bond to itself the next day. Sure it looks like it does but the joint will fail within months.

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