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Thread: Diablo seat upholstery

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Dec 2001
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    417

    Diablo seat upholstery

    I have been learning to do a bit of sewing and started with the seat shells. I have the uprights done and headrest but my problem is with the centre sections... I have tried three times now and trying to get the stitch lines decent has been a challenge. However my biggest issue is the gluing the vinyl to the backing half inch sew foam. When I sew the lines I have to roll or fold to fit the long section through the sewing machine and when it is done is creating wrinkles that don't seem to go away. I have tried two backing foams with the same results. What can I do to correct these wrinkles? Not gluing the vinyl to the foam? Heat gun?. Thanks.
    Last edited by lamboman; 02-22-2016 at 11:04 AM. Reason: Spelling

  2. #2
    Member
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    Jun 2015
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    Michigan, USA
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    Gluing vinyl to the foam is not the proper technique. Think about it there has to be an amount of ease for the top fabric to "roll" as you quilt pleats onto the foam to look right.

    Bond the two together with a perimeter stitch outside of your selvage line. This alone can be tricky but it's necessary to sewing. When stitching the perimeter go slow, constantly aware of your top material, pressing it to the edges. The panel you end with should lay flat by being snug- not overly stretched tight and have no creases/bunches along the stitches. I cut my foam 1" larger around so I'm basically basting the vinyl to it. Make sure your thread tension isn't too tight.

    Use tailor's chalk or quilter's pencil to draw out lines on top of the vinyl for your final topstitching.

    Also I find no shame in drawing my seam lines, especially for round shapes, on the back of my pieces before assembly. Creates a flawless seam and I don't have to stare at the foot or markings on the machine.

    I've never owned a walking foot but can say it's damn tough without one. The top material tends to stick under the single presser-foot so something like vinyl or leather can bunch up and stretch badly, creating puckers. The foot shouldn't be adjusted overly tight. I always try to keep a feeling between the layers, tugging the top material forward through the machine while holding back the bottom layer if I have to. I guess easing is the term. Vinyl is a highly advanced material to sew with it takes tons of practice (hopefully on scraps). Get to know your machine and play around with the adjustments sewing different thickness materials. Wrinkling can also be from anything else related to the machine: dull needle, top and bottom thread tension wrong or wrong pressure on the foot.

  3. #3
    Senior Member rodrieguz's Avatar
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    Aug 2003
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    270




    I glue the vinyl or leather to the foam on the diablo seats but it has to be done on a curve. Make a jig up so you can lay your material over it then glue the two pieces. The curve will help eliminate wrinkles and allow the material to relax back ad well. I also use chip board to make a rear panel for the foam that velcro to the fiberglass seat. Then make your side pieces to wrap around the foam (from top piece) and glue to the rear or the chip board. Creating a center section with no wingless and removable. Also the top piece is glued to the foam insert as well.
    Last edited by rodrieguz; 02-24-2016 at 11:22 AM.

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