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355 spyder build KB

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  • #16
    And here is the custom handle ive been creating, it started to pour as I was doing it so i havnt been able to fit it up yet but the concept is there. I didnt find anything on how to attach the door shells or creating handles/locks so im kinda making it up as I go along. i cant figure out how to slide the shell over the door without cutting off the fiberglass backing on one side of the door shell so if anyone knows a different way to do it before I cut up my door panel let me know.

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    • #17
      With the rear wheels, you've stumbled upon one of the big challenges facing F355 kit builders. Of the three different kits out there (AD355, IFG355, & CK3 F355) all of them need to have the face of the rear wheels moved outboard by about 4.3" inches per side. There are several ways to make that happen, and indeed many people use a combination of ways to get the right width:

      Option 1. Wheel spacers: lots of people use them and they're available custom made from several suppliers (try www.adaptitusa.com). Pros: cheapest solution. Cons: poor quality ones can fail; place higher loads on wheel bearings; not recommended on the front since they change the scrub radius;

      Option 2. High negative offset wheels: It's unlikely you'll be able to find wheels with enough negative offset, but you may be able to find some with a lot more than your current ones, and use thinner spacers; Cons: more expensive than spacers; place higher loads on bearings; not recommended for front wheels because of impact on scrub radius;

      Option 3. longer control arms and lower strut adapters: Arraut Motorsports has designed longer control arms and strut adapters to push your wheels outboard. Pros: less strain on bearings, fewer parts; Cons: more expensive, changes suspension geometry;

      Here's a couple photos of the strut adapters:

      Click image for larger version

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      Click image for larger version

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      Option 4. New engine cradle with wider side rails and use lower strut adapters: The wider rails move the control arms outboard allowing use of the stock arms. No one currently offers custom Fiero engine cradles, though there are lots of examples to go by. You'd still need the lower strut adapters to bridge the gap between the top of the knuckle and the bottom of the strut. Pros: retain stock lower control arms, close to stock geometry, design freedom. Cons: design and fabrication skills needed, can be expensive if farming out labour.

      Lastly, you shouldn't consider your options in isolation. You should also consider whether you're going to need to lower the car on the suspension to close the vertical gap as well. Dropping a chapman strut style suspension in the order of an inch isn't too significant, and many people do without feeling any negative side effects. Dropping the rear 2" changes the geometry considerably. Again, there will be those that chime in and say they've done this and felt no adverse effects, but the science doesn't lie. I've looked at this in depth and analyzed the effects using software expressly for this purpose, then graphed the results for many parameters to prove it. That's a whole other issue though.

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      • #18
        Wow... those panels are REALLY wide compared to the old Fiero door frames. I've never seen a 355 kit except in photos, so I didn't realize they were that much wider.

        Anyway, regarding the wheel issue... I have never built a kit, and have never had a kit, but I'm going to make a SWAG... Scientific Wild Arsed Guess...

        I think the 3" spacer plus the wider F-car style wheels makes up most of your 6" difference.

        It looks like you still have the Fiero wheels on the car. Not sure what year your car is, but TireSize.com says the 1984 Fiero wore 185/80R13 tires. Even the GT models from '87 and '88 only wore 205/60R15 on the front, and 215/60R15 rear. The same site says the F355 wore 225/40R18 front, and 265/40R18 rear.

        As I understand tire sizes, the first two sets of numbers are metric in millimeters. If so, that's 20 mm wider front, and 50 mm wider rear tires on the F355. If I remember 2nd grade math metric conversions... approximately 2.5 cm (or 25 mm) = 1 inch, so the F355 would have 2" wider tires on the rear than the Fiero had on the rear. Add a 3" spacer and a 2" wider tire, you're at 5" of your 6".

        Then again... I could be totally whack... I've never done this myself, so hopefully some of the more experienced guys will chime in soon. lol

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        • #19
          ^^ haha.... Looks like one of the more experienced guys did chime in while I was typing.

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          • #20
            Thank you both for the replies, Im thinking ill be going with bloozberry's option number 3 since I already bought the coil overs from Arraut last year when I got the cradle stretch done. looks like all i need to do is get the longer control arms and and extension plate. Do I need to extend the axle to accommodate this setup or are those the only 2 parts I need?

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            • #21
              Yep... you're going to need new axles too. But you should wait until you've got your hubs properly located with your new control arms so you can measure how long they really need to be. There isn't much room for error even though the tripot joint at the transmission does allow some flexibility... remember, you've got to keep that flexibility for when the suspension travels up and down, causing the axle to shorten and lengthen.

              Personally, I couldn't suggest what cars might have the right off-the-shelf length for you, but once you know how much longer they need to be I'm sure someone will be able to help. Your biggest challenge is going to be finding a passenger side axle since the stock Fiero axle is one of the industry's longest, but you'll need an even longer one. For my own car, I was able to adapt a jackshaft from another car for the passenger side, which meant that the actual axle could be much shorter. I still couldn't find any cars that had the right length axles with the correct spline count, so I bought a pair of used '96-'07 Dodge Caravan passenger side axles. Once I had removed the CV and tripot joints, the bare axle rods were 700 mm long and had the correct 27 mm diameter and 32 spline count at one end. I got a machine shop to cut the rods to the length I needed, and got them to re-spline the cut end for $75 an axle... considerably cheaper than having them custom made by say, Mosher. (I'd add photos but the damned uploader isn't working, again!)

              You might have to do the same sort of thing... find a jackshaft that will fit your trans and engine block. BTW, you didn't say what you had for an engine and trans.

              BTW: Drewbdo is mostly correct about the tire widths as well... just keep in mind that the wheel offset will determine if that extra width of the tire ends up towards the inside, outside, or divided between the two sides of the rim.

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              • #22
                Ok, I'm running the stock v6 with a manual transmission, I need to verify which transmission it is, hell im not even sure on the year to narrow it down.

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                • #23
                  Hea buddy,

                  Send me a PM with your email address and I'll send you a few photos of Funnywheels cradle with the new trailing arms attached along with a few others that my help you get this figured out.
                  My Projects:

                  http://www.madmechanics.com/forum/bu...y-project.html
                  http://www.madmechanics.com/forum/bu...-facelift.html
                  http://www.madmechanics.com/forum/bu...430-build.html

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                  • #24
                    I'm trying to use photobucket to see if the image shows up.

                    My Projects:

                    http://www.madmechanics.com/forum/bu...y-project.html
                    http://www.madmechanics.com/forum/bu...-facelift.html
                    http://www.madmechanics.com/forum/bu...430-build.html

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                    • #25
                      Ok looks like it worked

                      Here is another one showing the trailing arms mounted to the cradle
                      My Projects:

                      http://www.madmechanics.com/forum/bu...y-project.html
                      http://www.madmechanics.com/forum/bu...-facelift.html
                      http://www.madmechanics.com/forum/bu...430-build.html

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                      • #26
                        Notice the 1.5" wheel adapters that needed to be used as well. This was to keep the OEM wheels & tires from hitting the struts.


                        My Projects:

                        http://www.madmechanics.com/forum/bu...y-project.html
                        http://www.madmechanics.com/forum/bu...-facelift.html
                        http://www.madmechanics.com/forum/bu...430-build.html

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Here is one more of just the cradle with the new trailing arms installed

                          [
                          Last edited by MacGyver; 06-18-2016, 03:37 PM.
                          My Projects:

                          http://www.madmechanics.com/forum/bu...y-project.html
                          http://www.madmechanics.com/forum/bu...-facelift.html
                          http://www.madmechanics.com/forum/bu...430-build.html

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