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1962 Ferrari 250 GTO scratch build

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  • Thanks for the congratulations and project praise. The more I get the car sorted out the prouder I get about what I've been able to build.


    Over the last few days, I've added a cross over tube in the exhaust (big improvement with a much smoother exhaust note now), replaced an under rated coil over spring, and rewired the radiator cooling fan to properly work as a "puller" instead of blowing air back through the grill opening. I had the wheels/tires aligned yesterday and the car really does handle like it's on rails.
    Joel Heinke
    Be original; don't be afraid of being bold!

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    • Superb Work Joel

      Originally posted by C5GTO View Post
      Thanks for the congratulations and project praise. The more I get the car sorted out the prouder I get about what I've been able to build.


      Over the last few days, I've added a cross over tube in the exhaust (big improvement with a much smoother exhaust note now), replaced an under rated coil over spring, and rewired the radiator cooling fan to properly work as a "puller" instead of blowing air back through the grill opening. I had the wheels/tires aligned yesterday and the car really does handle like it's on rails.

      Hi Joel, Great to see the car now finished and on the road, what an amazing job you have done, just one tiny point is the seat belt mounting ? but I assume you are already know that and are trying to remedy, I just wish I was further on than I am with my GTO but I have another 15 years to go so no rush, any way congrats you must be very very pleased with you result, so hope you have many many happy miles of motoring, Regards Eddie

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      • That car is amazing. When you first started building this and publishing it in the magazine, I followed your articles and couldn't wait to see it finished. I would never have guessed it would take this long, but so what - it was definitely worth it.

        Thanks for being an inspiration to so many!

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        • The car looks stunning Joel! Superb job you did.
          -Vince
          Remember, there is always next year.

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          • Wow, just... wow! I love and hate to see the car in its "Nearly Completed" state. What an amazing car. I am sure there will be a lot of visits for innocent bystanders to the doctors for neck injuries from your drive by's. lol

            No seriously though, what an amazing conclusion. Hats off to you my friend for a job very VERY well done. Enjoy the car to it's fullest. You certainly deserve it.
            It's a never ending battle of making your cars better and also trying to be better yourself. - Dale Earnhardt Sr

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            • As I’ve been driving the GTO around on these hot CA summer days, had some 100+ degree days recently, the AC does a decent job of combating the heat until it doesn’t. At temps below 90, the AC works fine. At 90+ it works until I make a stop or two, then after that it just blew hot air until I let the engine completely cool and then the AC started blowing cold again.

              After a few times of this, the cause became apparent to me. The AC condenser was getting heat soaked driving AC system pressure up to a point where the binary safety switch would prevent the AC compressor from energizing. Engine coolant temps always run between 190 to 200 degrees so the engine wasn’t overheating. Given the long, low nose on the GTO, I had to mount the radiator at about 45 degrees such that the AC condenser is more mounted on top of it than in front of it. So when the car is turned off, the heat coming off the radiator naturally goes upward and into the AC condenser. I have a 15” puller electric fan but the shroud that came with it only covers about half of the radiator core. This was sufficient for engine cooling but obviously not for hot day AC operation.

              I decided it was time to build a “full size” fan shroud out of 5052 .063 aluminum. My objective was to be able to install/remove the fan and shroud without having to drain coolant. This meant a multi-piece shroud would be required and I’d need to assemble it all in place during installation. The radiator core is 16” tall by 31” wide and the shroud would cover 100% giving 1 ” space for air flow.

              I started by making a cardboard template, cutting out and folding up the largest shroud piece.



              This shroud piece mounts to the fan via the four Rivnuts and the fan has legs that mount it to the car chassis. This shroud piece was test fit to radiator to ensure fit.




              Next was to make a 2 ” tall circular fence to enclose the fan blades. The circumference of the fence is 50” so I decided to make it in two pieces since it exceeded the 48” width of aluminum sheet. I folded the flat sheet into 90 degree angle with ” base. Using the linear stretching dies on my TM Tech style power hammer the base was stretched till the fence formed a nice 15 ” diameter circle.





              After a bunch of additional templates, cutting, folding, welding, swearing, and test fitting, I had a completed shroud. Here’s the completed shroud next to the original one for comparison.



              I salvaged the push on rubber bulb seal from the original shroud for sealing the new shroud where it meets up to the radiator tanks. Here it is all installed and ready to go.



              Time will tell if this is the complete fix for the AC issues but I can say that the fan now draws a tremendous amount of air through the nose openings and through the radiator.
              Joel Heinke
              Be original; don't be afraid of being bold!

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