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Mercedes CLK GTR Replica from Scratch

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  • TRcrazy
    replied
    Don, I checked what steel I have here and turns out, I have enough tube to build most of the cabin.
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    Alfo, I am considering building the cabin on the shop floor and take the precautions to set-up correctly as you pointed out. Google Sketchup is fairly crude and lacks advance features but has proven itself to turn out accurate parts. Sketchup does have sort of a "home' zero XYZ , its where the red, blue and green axis lines intersect. I can easily create a corresponding zero point in the garage to indicate the chassis's location to match the drawing as you suggest. The front and rear suspension cross members are done so onto the Middle! Thanks for taking the time to post , -Vinny

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  • aflo
    replied
    This is a very interesting project, especially seeing your cad work, then moving to real parts.
    You may already have addressed this but having an accurate build setup is important. I would suggest having a reference system consisting of at least a center-line and cross reference lines on the floor. The vehicle is securely put on stands of some kind, near design height, centered and leveled out as much as possible with some kind of angles and carpenter's laser level, etc. Then you can make measurements from the cad files and any "reverse engineering" measurements you have made on components. You could even fabricate wooden "rails" along the sides, from which to measure things. Professional designs studios have large iron surface plates and all kinds of measuring things, physical, optical, analog & digital. That way symmetricality is assured and your cad work can predict clearance issues and even hinged things like doors, etc. You can use the cad to work out assembly order and clearances. I assume the cad file already has zero reference lines in all three dimensions (x-fore & aft, y-sideways from center-line and z- height from some convenient reference point). It may be advisable to move the math model in the cad setup so all x and z dimensions are positive - you would still have plus and minus on the Y axis.
    In the mean time, keep going and please keep sharing your work on here.

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  • Don
    replied
    Time to turn those cardboard tubes into metal Vinny. Frame is looking good so far.

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  • TRcrazy
    replied
    Hey Joel, I did consider the center tunnel and the rockers (ala GT40) as a location, but was unable to source an off the shelf fuel cell that made $ense.

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  • C5GTO
    replied
    Vince: why not make the fuel tank a long, narrow, short one running between the seats? This results in less change to front/rear weight bias as fuel level changes and more weight on front tires. It also could potentially give you more leg room if you need it. Just a thought...

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  • TRcrazy
    replied
    The garage floor represents the floor of the car, The USPS box is the placeholder for the 17 gal Fuel Cell. The engine will be several inches lower in the real chassis.
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    The Audi v6 looks to be a 90 degree configuration and with the accessories tucked in below and above the cylinder heads up front, it makes for a wide but very compact assembly. Axle center line to the front of the engine is only 30 inches.
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    Last edited by TRcrazy; 10-12-2020, 02:35 PM.

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  • TRcrazy
    replied
    I set the Engine/Trans combo in place to check my dimensions against my drawings. I found I have 3 additional inches of room between the front of the engine and the firewall compartment that will hold the Fuel Cell. In this pic you see the shifter cable right up against the Exhaust Manifold flange. I'll likely need to re-route at least one cable to come into the trans at another angle. The Boxster Shifter & Cables are meant for a flat six not a V6 so some mods will be necessary. I need the crossover link at the trans side to get the linkage to function, this part alone is $500 from Porsche and I've never seen it sold used by itself, its usually included on a used transmission. My trans was missing it when I bought it, So I made the adj link using 10mm ball socket ends from a pair of trunk lift arms. I was glad when I sat in the seat and selected each of the gears with little effort or binding up. And it gave me an excuse to buy a Metric Tap & Die Set . The classic Win-Win right ?
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    Last edited by TRcrazy; 10-12-2020, 12:02 PM.

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  • TRcrazy
    replied
    Hey , How'd that Old Guy get into my garage ???

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  • TRcrazy
    replied
    I hope everyone is doing good. While working on my chassis drawings I occasionally wish I could sit in the computer model before cutting and tacking up metal tubing. I work with corrogated plastic sheets and always have cut-off scraps laying around. They can be easily slit and folded into shapes so I started with one piece and then two and you know where this is going. I soon had mocked up the cabin at full scale then set the front suspension cross member into position. I was glad to see that sitting in my seat, I had clearance for the clutch pedal to miss the vertical suspension cross member, and I also had enough leg room not feel cramped. Also I didnt realize I was starting to lose my hair. Well, you gotta take the good with the bad I guess -Vince
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  • TRcrazy
    replied
    Hey Don, the corvette suspension is in the CAD model at stock height mounting points and stock geometry. Right now there no need to mount the hubs on brackets like others have done. The plan is to use the top of the chassis table datum to set the bottom of the car’s frame as the lowest point on the chassis, which will be the cockpit floor. In XYZ coordinates it represents Z-O. Both front and rear susp cradles are above the floor and will sit on spacer plates while the chassis is laid out and welded together . Hope I explained the right . Thanks for following along , -Vince

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  • Don
    replied
    Looking good Vinny;

    Are you going to add in additional levels for the suspension to sit at proper ride height off the side of the table as well? I was thinking of doing the same kind of table when I get to my Countach. Then i can set up the hubs at proper ride height and then can measure everything from there as well.

    Looking good and enjoying the updates.

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  • TRcrazy
    replied
    Working on a chassis table, this version is12 feet long and 16.5" high.
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    Last edited by TRcrazy; 08-16-2020, 05:11 PM.

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  • TRcrazy
    replied
    I gotta get crackin' on this car, Joel is already at 17 pages in his thread !
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    Here's a small update of the reworked front corner of the chassis, The new version in the bottom pic flows a lot better now. -Vince
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  • TRcrazy
    replied
    Yeah, its like drawing with markers in a coloring book, kinda gratifying. Over this past weekend I put 8 hours into the TR doing inner sheet metal work ,no one will ever see it when its together. Ah the ups and down of it all. Lol !!

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  • C5GTO
    replied
    Looking good Vinny! Wouldn't it be nice if the physical build could be as fast as the virtual build

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