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Tips for a Long Term Build

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  • Tips for a Long Term Build

    Hello everyone, I hope you are all doing well . The purpose of this thread is to share methods and tips on how to “keep at it “ in a long term build. Also to share shortcuts you find useful in building, making parts or in shop layout. Over the years I’ve picked up a few helpful routines that have kept me going when I wanted to pack it in. The 512Tr I have here is a 20 year project, though if you had asked me how long it would take to finish when I bought the kit I’d have said 6 months tops. I build at a pace now that is slower but I’m turning out better parts. It’s always a tug of war between making a part pretty and making it fast. Fast and good would be a happy medium.
    .
    -I find that using a dry erase board is useful to write what comes next in the order of things, and crossing off finished tasks is a good motivator for me. Seems like I’m getting something done.
    .
    -Clean the shop, this one comes up when I can’t find the right hand snips because all the tools are all over the bench.
    The hour is time well spent, I’ll finish with sweeping the floor and I’m ready for the next round.
    .
    -Sometimes a short perspective on the build is better, stay focused on the section you’re working on. You have to walk past that other part that needs re-wiring . It’s tempting to drop what you’re doing and jump to that other task. In the long run you’re better off completing each section before moving on.
    .
    that’s all I have for now, I look forward to reading about other methods and learning some new tips, -Vince
    Remember, there is always next year.

  • #2
    Agree with everything you said. 10 yrs on Fiero, 4 on body kit.
    - Find a comfortable "thinking" chair for looking at project.
    - Patience
    - find something else to do when you get burnt on the project...Go mow the lawn...

    I'm sure there's a million more.

    Bob
    Bob custom '84 Fiero SE --->>> custom F408
    http://www.madmechanics.com/forum/cu...ilepic37_1.gif

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    • #3
      Here are a few that I've learned over the years:

      - Start a build thread somewhere... anywhere. Once it's created, it develops a life of its own, one that begs for constant feeding. Knowing that other people are interested in what you're doing is a huge boost to motivation;

      - Even if you have only an hour to spare, get out there and spend it tinkering, brainstorming, polishing, or just plain observing. It all pays off in finding solutions to problems, or discovering better ways to do things;

      - Get your significant-other involved, if even just to hold a light. Long-term projects need your spouse to be on-board or you'll be fighting over money and time being spent;

      - Building a kit car or replica has to be as much about the journey as the destination. If you think otherwise, you'll be unhappy about either the amount of time it's taking, or the quality of the end product;

      - All projects need four things simultaneously to advance: money, time, skill, and space. If you're missing any one of these at any given moment, you don't get very far before coming to an impasse;

      - Build it as though you'll have to take it apart and maintain it... because you're almost certainly going to have to do both many times.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Bloozberry View Post
        - All projects need four things simultaneously to advance: money, time, skill, and space. If you're missing any one of these at any given moment, you don't get very far before coming to an impasse
        AMEN! Well said, and oh so true.

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        • #5
          For this CLK build I have been keeping information in separate binders to help log specific information, such as the year and model of the car that a particular part came from, or maybe the contact info for a vendor I bought from or plan to use in the future. I broke out the car into 25 sections such as Brakes, Steering, Chassis, Electrical, etc and combined a few into into a single binder. When I scribble down an idea for a part of the car, it may go thru a few versions to get to the one that I'll actually try to make, This drawing is then dated, hole- punched and put into the binder for that section. There are too many components to keep it all in my head, these binders have really helped the project move forward.


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          Last edited by TRcrazy; 10-01-2020, 08:16 PM.
          Remember, there is always next year.

          Comment


          • #6
            Agree with everyone above. One thing I am finding now that I am back into final assembly is:

            DOCUMENT THE TAKE APART PROCESS......
            • Take pics of the area before taking apart, and store for reassembly
              • Most of us have horrible memories after many years so don't be shy on pics and diagrams
            • Bag and really label the bags well so 10 years later, that scribble actually makes sense
              • A daily search and frustration looking for parts I know I have somewhere but can't find and having to look really close at each bag to figure out what I wrote
            • When putting the bags and parts away for storage use plastic totes or containers that do not break down over time and also label those really well
              • Moving a half dozen boxes regularly trying to remember what box part A is in is getting really old. Also cardboard breaks down after a while so getting harder to stack all the time...
            • Any electrical you do, create drawings and get them into excel or some other drawing so that you can easily read the pin outs later
              • My dash wiring is on the back of a letter size paper and I never went in to clean it up in excel so now I am trying to read old writing
            These are everything I DID NOT do and paying the price now. I like Vinny's binder system as my pile of letter size paper is always a nightmare to look through....

            And above everything as everyone above says, do not give up and get out there as much as you can even for an hour as it all ads up to progress and keeps you engaged when the issues hit or the ambition wobbles....

            Cheers
            Don
            Last edited by Don; 10-06-2020, 12:15 AM.
            308 Ferrari replica
            Prova Countach 5000S

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Don View Post

              And above everything as everyone above says, do not give up and get out there as much as you can even for an hour as it all ads up to progress and keeps you engaged when the issues hit or the ambition wobbles....

              Cheers
              Don
              Good points Don, particularly the one in quotes above as its what I did the other day in the garage. I had received my Boxster Shifter and cables from ebay and wanted mock them up. I was still missing a critical piece of the Porsche shift linkage at the transmission and I needed it to try the Shifter.
              .
              After remembering I had purchased the correct size ball ends a while back, all that was needed was the matching threaded rod, 4 nuts and a threaded middle coupler. So thru the scrap metal bin I looked for a section of rod, 15 minutes on the lathe, tap it to 6m x 1.0 and I had the linkage I needed. The test of the shifter went perfect, All gears were selected with a nice feel at the lever.
              .
              OK, here's the reality of building. Total time spent including taking a break for lunch, looking at my phone, scratching my head and daydreaming : 6 hours.
              .
              But, now that the task is done and one more thing is crossed off the list. I can add it the Binder marked TRANSMISSION and include the description of the ball sockets and and the thread coupler for later if I need to make another or someone asks me how I made that.
              .
              I turned off the light in the garage and felt like I accomplished at least one thing, and took one more of many steps in the direction of having a finished car.
              (there's a pic of it in my build thread today)
              Last edited by TRcrazy; 10-12-2020, 03:06 PM.
              Remember, there is always next year.

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